Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode · 1 year ago

Think Twice Before Launching B2C: How Satish Movva’s B2B Strategy Skyrocketed His Award-Winning Wearable Tech

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

One of the biggest hurdles an innovator faces is the quest to prove you have a solid product-market fit. (Especially because many innovators fall prey to their own assumptions that their innovation will be loved by the masses, without pausing to get the masses’ thoughts first.)

This quest is closely tied to another huge hurdle: getting traction in the early stages. In the vast majority of cases, the early adopters, or first users of your innovation, will be quite different than your mainstream users down the road.

And it’s absolutely critical to address this as early as possible.


On today’s episode, CarePredict Founder and CEO Satish Movva tells us about his savvy early adoption strategy. It’s clear that this early strategy led to the success of his multi-award-winning wearable device, which he developed to help care for his elderly parents. Satish shares:

  • His early adoption strategy of testing his device in the smaller, more controllable environments of senior living centers vs. trying to scale too quickly with a commercial model
  • That a B2B early adoption strategy doesn’t mean you can’t go B2C later — but it will help give you invaluable insights to iterate your innovation before your mainstream launch
  • How the mindset of jumping straight to the B2C market is one of the biggest reasons that innovators never get off the ground
  • Some of the key game-changers and differentiators of his device, like being the first wearable on the market to be able to track arm gestures

 


Guest Bio

Satish Movva is the Founder and CEO of CarePredict, a wearable device that helps to predict serious health issues in seniors before they happen. CarePredict has earned several awards and accolades, including earning a spot in the Digital Health 150 and being named as an Honoree for Wearable Technology Developed Just for Seniors at the CES 2020 Innovation Awards.

Satish has spent nearly three decades working in healthcare tech, holding positions with companies ranging from large provider and physician corporations to household names like IBM.

To learn more, visit www.carepredict.com or connect with him on LinkedIn.

Welcome to Coiq, where you learn howhealth innovators maximize their success. I'm your host Dor roxy,founder of legacy, DNA and International Beth selling author ofhow health innovators to maximize market success through candidconversations with health innovators earlier doctors and influencers you'lllearn how to bring your innovation from idea to start up to market domination,and now, let's jump into the latest episode of Coiq, welcome back t oiq listeners on today'sepisode. I am really excited. We have satich Mova with us. He is the CEO andfounder of care predict a couple of things I want to share with you. Thatmakes this S. episode really exciting is that they were recently noted orslated on the digital health one fifty list as one of the most promisingdigital health startups and then also recently. Let me Jimmy make sure I gotthis right. You guys were just awarded the CES two thousand and twentyinnovation award on a re for wearable technology development. Just forseniors, congratulations, thank you! Wearo most doctormone and welcome tothe show, but so I think I'd like to just start offwith you telling us a little bit about your background and what you do for theAr listeners, who don't know you yet yeah. So I've been in technology nowfor about thirty clus years and twenty six of those have been in healthcaretechnology. So I bean in very large provider corporations physiciancorporations all the way to working with folks like IBM throughout my longcareer in Healthcar Technology, okay, nice and so a little bit about hair predict andwhat you're doing there yeah so can predict. I really started car predictprimarily to take care of my own parents, my dad's, ninety four, thisyear and my mom's eighty four. They live about ten minutes away from me andI speak to them every day. But when I show up on a Saturday along with mykids into, I almost always find things that are completely new, that I had noidea about and more often than not that led me to take them to the yard thatday or pretty much mess up. My following weeks, like schedule justspecialistappointments and looking to see if I could get some idea about whatwas going in their life because unpredictablety in their health wascausing havoc in Min, and that's how I came about to create care predict toessentially give me that heads up about what's going on, so I think that's fascinating, and Ithink I told you on our precall. I want to buy one of these. I need a couple ofthem so describe what it's like to be ahealthcare entrepreneur today and a...

...pioneer in this in the space yeah. I thinkthere are a lot of really smart people. Looking at this issue, you knowweldbide, the number of seniors are growing at a tremendous rate. Thenumber of caregivers who can care for them and the number of payers who canpay for the care has been decreasing, Qar te it because Er aly lot longerthan we expected so a whole bunch of very smart health caonconeurs arelooking at this. I think they're coming at it from multiple different ways.Somebody like me, coming from within the industry IARE trying to fashion asolution that fits into the current work flows of the physicians and thecurrent healthcare system and can fit into that rimversement model in some ofthe other antpreneurs coming from the technology side out of the valley arecoming at it from this. Is this really nice technology? Is there anapplication in senior car, so both of those are coming together andoubtailing together to really create the best in bread solutions out therefor technology for aging, seniors, yeah yeah, and I think that it's great, becausethat's I think, what's going to help transform the industry is theconvergence of those two mindsets. So do you have experience in otherverticals in your past career? I have actually I started out actually as avery neep technologist. I was working an operating systems and networkingcurrent of tacks and things like that for IBM, and then I went on to workwith IBM in in different veticles and insuranceverticles, as well as law enforcement verticles in Scotland in new zerlandbefore I came back into the healthcare system here in the US. So how would you you know what uld would be some of thedifferences or how would you describe what it's like to develop and innovatetechnology and other verticals compared to healthcare? Today, I think I would say that health care has alwayslagged other verdicles in adopting new technology, mainly because it's thekind of problem we are dealing with real lives, real people and people arealways going to be a little bit more conservative and how they adopt yowtechnology, but as in some of the other Woyd, it goes like law enforcement orinsurance. It's very much. A dollar sens sense equation on investment, and they can deploytvery very quickly. There is there aren't any bad consequences therewherers in healthcare. There could be bad consequences if you get somethingwrong: Yeap Yep, absolutely! You know it's interesting, there's a lot of lipservice going on about health care, annivation and you know everybody'stalking about it. So it seems like for the level of talk, that's happening. Itseems like there's a lot of adoption. What's your perspective on thedifference between talk and adoption, I think you that's very perceptive ofyou. By the way there is a lot of hype...

...around digital health and lot ofinnovation going on. I think the way to look at it is you know how many ofthose really get out of the pilot stage, where they're proven and a true returnon investment and have the efficacy that people are looking for Witth Ays.You know how many actually get into commercial and come all the way throughthat I's a large drop off right from pilot to actual commercial in the disalhouse pace. So a lot of the new innovators that are coming in ar comingin not necessarily with the domain expedis of health, but the domainexperdies of technology yeah, sometimes what they think will work in the spacedust you cannot make. You know around Pik fo in a square hole yeah yeahabsolutely- and I would just add to that. So you were talking about thosetwo segments that are kind of coming together. So you've got thosetechnologists that may not be familiar with the domain of health care and thenyou've got those folks in health care who have lots of expertise right there,a lot of times they're living with the problem that they're trying to solve, but often they get so in love withtheir solution. They think everybody's going to love it just as much as theydo right. That's that's! Every founder you everspeak to will believe their solution is the PANACEA SINC picepread, but you really have tolet the market decide that Su ell. That's the market is the ultimate. Youknow judg an Arbitrof, this yeah ANTEL, how many of these digital healthplatforms have been adopted and have goten to commercial successles US thosethat haven't and there's a very clear indicator to you. You know what is working, what is notwork yeah so so help us understand what has beenyour process for developing your early adoption strategy yeah. So when westarted this, I was trying to really build a solution for people like me,adult child of Pasenor really struggling with their parent care, soit was more paggeted to its condumers, but along the way in two thousand andfifteen, we realize that trying to put this technology in hundreds of homes issomething that at our stage was not scaleabe as a startup. We cannot go toa hundred different homes and support a hundred different seniors and have eyeson a hundred different seniors to understand how the device is performingversus their own. You know activties and behaviors, so we somewhat pivitedthe company to say we're going to go after senior upoleve, idependent living assisted living. Now,I'm a DIMENTO CARE centers. Where ther, you know hundred or more residentsinifacalty altogether, and you have thirty to forty staff that are there totake care of them and what that gave us really was a very controlled embronmentwhere we could deply our product and actually the measure have well it'sworking, because we have the staff there who had eyes on the residence andwe can compare what they are saying: Vesus. What our DEVIC is saying, and italso allowed us to send our nurses into...

...the facility to collect data to LabelerDad Usei expensivel in our platform. But for you to do ai correctly, youneed what it's called labeled data yeah. You know when somebody fell, you needto know when somebody heare you an e attract infaction. You need to knowwhen somebody was depressed, so you could train your AI training, Yeplanning training mordels to know, while these were the initial conditionsthat led to this consequence that labeling of the data that falls beingin that senior Roupliin facility really allowed us to do that extremely well,and I look at my peers out in the industry that kind of went out afterthe consumer Marno. First, they were all stringing and they are still allstruggling because it's not scalable to deploy it in mask uondegins her howwell it works, whereas in a controll enronment you have really good and mostimportantly, Y, have the same group of people going through the facility, andyou have this long term. Abot keep to look and see how your product ischanging them. Changing their activity, behaviorsandtis't, really truly making a difference or not. So I want to pausehere and really dig deeper into this, because I think that this is a topicthat is so important to innovators, to our listeners that very often there's this decisionbetween btob or BTC, and a lot of folks that I talk to. Theywant to circumvent the bureaucracy and the red tape right of reimbursementrates and go straight to BTOC and and feel, like you know, hey I'm goin to sgoing to do some facebook ads, you know and and I'm going to expand and getthis Marketa get this adoption in the market and so help me understand whatyou're saying on what you decided and why you decided it early on and thenwhat was the thing that made you pivot and change yeah. I would say thatyou're, absolutely right and there's a whole lot of people doing aftor, be tosee just trying to get engagement through facebook, ATS and so on. But Ithink I would diffrenciate that by saying there are certain piecs oftechnology that are maybe only software model apps that may benefit from thatrap. But if you have any kind of a wearable device or any kind of ahardware component or something that's a little bit more sophisticated, thatrequires essentially accurated in introduction of that product. Beteseisnot going to scare for you. You can spend a lot of money. You knowgetting a lot to acquire consumers, whether facebook, as or whatever thosethings had up pretty quickly, aute sure yeah. It's not cheap and and kind of rollthat out Allo the country or ingeographical reasion or whatever, butyou're going to be like a pinball going to all theseplaces, trying to get figured out what's going on. So do you think thatthat's because it's the early stage of...

...the product, development and you'restill trying to prove the safety and efficacy of thesolution, even even prior to that it's the product market, fit that Odi reallyaddressed the question or not ten. You will not know W in your mind. It mayabsolutely address it to the end, the degree, but until it's in the wild onsomebody's wrest or on somebody's mobile phone, and they tell you thathonest candid feedback, it's only in your head, yeah that very early segmentthat very earlier after the four fifty eighty people are going to shape yourparduct for eternity, not necessarily for eturniy but at lease for the nextright right right, because they are going to tell you what works. Whatdoesn't work you know you may go in with the assemption yeah every goeveryone's going to wear my device. Well then, you're going to find out, ohit's too big or it's wrong, color or whatever it may be like we didoriginally with our very very first versions and that allowed us to refinethe product Marketfich and the earlier actors are the ones that have gown toshape, and you want that to be a very diverse group, but you also want thatto be a controlled engrounment, so you can repeatedly iterate on the product.Take it back to them and say now. Does this fact Yoon Ontacton of what thisthing is supposed to be: Yeah measuring the functional aspects of the device orthe software as well to see itit really changing or making the changes in theirhealt that you thought it for. So I think that I almost want you to repeat everythingyou said, but I won't have you do that because it's I just want to reinforceit for our listeners. You know. So it sounds like what I hear. You're sayingis you're not saying that you know you or the company won't ever go to B, to cright, you're, just saying that that is not your initial path, that for thereasons that you just described. So it's maybe still e part of your face toor longer term adoption strategy, but doing, b, to b right now, because youhave a device with an APP and you need to prove safety and efficacy and youneed to prove product market fit Apursit e bdb yeah. So we launched thepilots in two thousand and fifteen. We ended the province in two thousand andseventeen. We had two years of solid data and then we started commercallyoffering the product and seniyour group living both here in the USAND in Japan,and it's been very, very successful for we're all on the US now and in fourthquarter of two thousand and nineteen we actually launched the product throughhome cared channels into the person's homes. So that's our gee to be to seeagain you're taking that disimation fanol you're, taking that person whohas hands and eyes on that individual three or four times a week, you'eplowing you through that channels and you're giving yourself the scalabilityof the channel that' super inporlet. You know you need to be able to use anintermediory to get to a couple of hundred consumers not directly sell tothe consumer, because it's much more...

...expensive that sad! Because of theaward at CS that we received in January for the innovation in VerabaleTechnology. We actually also deployed our product to Directo consumers aswell. So we have a beautiful retail kid, that's design for a senior living athome and then you can purchase it right on our website and very soon misson aswell, and the interesrally there was and weu're not yere, doing any kind ofmassive advertising or anything about that hardect, because we want the HomeKa Channel to prove out that it works really well in consumer and then thoseearly adopters in the Directto consumers who have a such impressingneed that Thei'r scouring the web. Looking for technology like ours, whenthey come to us they're going to see it, these are the earlier doptors you want,because they're motivated they want to try Tho they're, also forgiving. Ifthere are any flaws in it, because they're going to help us Chang Esiexatly at's it, and so it's a very soft launch- and you always should do aconsumer thing as a soft launch, because there are going to be questionsthat you have to answer, and there are going to be problems that you did notanticipate that a consumer will find no much variation out there in that in theworld of consumers. You're going to have unexpected things brought to yourattention and you will have the room to make those changes, define it and thendo the big launch, Ou knoaround a mothers day or some other figute hey.It's Dr Roxy, here with the quick break from the conversation. Do you want yourinnovation to succeed to change lives to shape the future of health care? Iwant that for every health innovator, which is why I invented Coi Q, anevidence based framework to take your innovation from an idea to start up tofull market adoptions, if you're, not sure where you are in thecommercialization process. Take the free assessment now at Dr RoxycomBacksh, four: don't miss out on impacting more lives just because youhave a low coiq score. The Free Assessment is at Dr Roxycom back four,that's Dr Rox IECOM backslash sc ore and now, let's jump back into theconversation, and I think that it's even moreimportant with a complex buying process like healthcare where you've got youknow a buyer and then you've got maybe a sponsor and then you've got theuser. I was talking to someone the other day that you know is doingsomething in the home. It's not like care predict at all, but something towhere they've got. Folks like you and I that are the actual buyer. But thenthey've got a senior person, that's the...

...user and the like you and I they wereall over it. They were buying it. But when it came to the person using it,they didn't like it, and so you know being able to identify product marketfit which each person that plays a role in that buying cycle is so critical andit sounds like that's what you're talking about absolutely that's exactlywhat I'm talking bout, because it's the user is different. So in seeing Yorgroup living, you know you have a hundred people wearing our device. Youhave a forty staff wearing adyvice, it's pretty much a conditionofresidency and is not out of the ordinary people are expected to wear itbecause it's also the door key in the Helle on e doors. That's how you getback into your apartment or condo there. It makes absolute sense, but henow you suddenly go to a single senior living at home. There aren't other eyesand yours out there therare families and coming in all the time looking atthem and no family wants to give this. You know you- and I want to give thisto our parents for our peace of mind, but you have to look at it from Berperspect. The Win Dowse elderly folks can be really stubborn, absolutely allbeing denial that they need anything likeven, though you and I know that parbecause we know truly, what's going on yeah yeah, exactly just feel it'sAbornento whet. I don't want to wear it. You know, so you have to be reallypactful Hawe. You go about social engineering them into Veret Ond. Thesecret weapon I can share with all of your listeners is Coa the grandkids and I think grandma or GRANDPA will nowdo for grand grandkid. Oh, my Guy Te aallan got awar of this for me and shewill wear it. I guarantee you, I can just see your ad campaign in the futureright. The great kids are on camera and they're saying come on. Grandma putthis on. For me, you know it's to keep them safe and allto keep them living long enough to see all the goals hatd. The grandchildrenare going to meet yeah yeah. Ultimately, that's mhat. It's all about sure, theother one that I think of is just the physician. You know I you know when wewere talking before. I told you that my ninety one, ninety one year oldgrandmother, lives with us and I'm telling you it doesn't matter what Isay, but whatever that doctor says I mean you write it, you take it to thecheck and cash itlet. The bank I mean the doctor has so much influencewhatever that doctor tells her she's going to do, which also would beanother factor at play, with a btob versus a BTB strategy right exactly youneed a person of the inauthority yeah. Also out of it is also you know. As weall get older, we live aspirasionally. You know we say you know you might wantto do two miles of walking, aday and stuff like that, and sometimes wecommunicate that Bay as well, and so we find a lot of seniors when they'respeaking to the r physicians are not necessarily upfrend about how activethey are or how actuve they are not,...

...and so sometimes the physician is kindof operating under misconception. The person is a lot more active than thetruly ar the physicians need. afflect you data as well to take care of Soannand the physician telling grandma. You got to wear this because then I'll knowa lot more about you if you're skipping meals or if you're eating less- and Ican help you- you know, live longer and make sure you can see all of your grandkids goals- that's powerful, but the doctor needs the information. That'sone of the messages. We are communicating the be to be Wel SII. Youknow it's not only from the careside, but also from the payers. The medicatadvantage plans, wit tebout. You know they are working in a capitated modelwhere they only make money. If they keep you healthy, the minute you ill goto the R, the lose and the lost all thad years, money on genit thou. Theyare very, very interested in learning more about what's going on in thatindividual's life, and how can they help at the earlies signs of you know,fatigue or malnutrition, risk of a fall or just COPA, t yeah, yeah, absolutelyso satich. I want to ask you, you know, as you kind of think, about the lastfew years of your journey. What do you think some of the decisions orstrategies that you've deployed that have been just Gane Changers for you? I would say that the very first instance of this product,where we put on the dominant arm and started tracking gestures of the arm.That is something that's very novel. There's still nobody doing that soyou're getting Thai actual fork left to them out or drinks it to the mouth.That is truly a differentiated that still nowe is really caught up to andwe think that's a game changer, because that's directly measuring a particularaccuity or behavior, rather than using a proxy Ofsitaly S, you open theRefrigugrat the door. So I can assume you wait, that's the all world and this your actwith they eat or not. That's been a game changer. The other thing thatreally came to US- and this goes back to that whole product market fit ouroriginal first version- had an enclosed matter and it would last anywhere fromfive to seven days, but they needed to be taken off and put on a Wilelestraler to be charged Yep. What we found very quickly was when it's taken offit's very hard to get them to put it back on, because theye foran bout, itIl theyve moved on so so our next giteration was a game changer. Where wemade I a replaceable swapable badgery without having to take it off the restand that completely changed the adoption right, because now there's noreason for you to take it off, and you know you look herd yeah. Youlook at something like an Apple Watch, which you have to take up every nightto charge. You know that will never work for a senior, because what arethey going to do? They're going to put on the bedside? So when they go to thebathroom at night they fall. They have no way of calling anybody for Helth. Iforgot to put it back on because it's on my charger, my night stand...

...exactly yeah wow so would have been some of thelows in your experience. You know, I know a lot of people don't want to talkabout it, but we all know that entrepreneurship is not all rainbowsand butterflies. It is a tough, tough gig out there, so would have beensomeof share. You know just candidly some of those moments where maybe youthought this is not going to work or you know whatever it would be. What wersome of those examples yeah, I think the toughest the earliest I mean thereare always hizes and lows throughout the journey and we've been added forfive plus years. The earliest lows were really around the gesture recognicion.Can we ever get to a stage where we would have a high accuracy and th theearliest stages? It was disharkning because we spend about a year and ahalf working on that there's a lot of variation and howpeople eat. So at the end, we had to come up with brand new algorthms thathad never been done before, and a machine learning, Marrlon or vairablethat can actually track that that you know that could have killed acompany if we ween't able to do that. Bui and all thos certain bright PhDs,and they figured it out, and so we were able to get this subsequent to that.You know the prock market fat. All of those have been very good. Customeradoption has been very good. POLATORS alsoa been good. I would however, saythe one area that is still somewhat of the struggle is getting the venture funding for technologiesthat are addressing senior care needs. You know if you are creating, I don'tknow an Nobe for cats. People are going to put hundres of millions of toms, but if you're doing anything meaningfulin the JESTOL help around to take care of aging seniors, there aren't a wholelort of venture apples who, as specialized in that, so there's not awhole lot of people you can go through, especially if you got hardware as partof your solutions, it's nearly impossible to get funding in siliconvalluy. They really should rename it to software valley. Now CASIT NA they'll find you, but if it'sanything to do with real hangible stuff, it's very difficult to get that andthat's been a struggle. But now we are seeing more and more a lot of the we CS.Themselves are aging and now they're thinking about o. How do I take care ofmy dad and mom, and so that light bult has gone off, and so, especially sinceabout last quarter, t o thousand and nineteenthrough now weare, seeing big shifts in how people are looking at agingdemocraphics throughout the world. We have people from all over the world nowinvesting in senior care and technologies, and it doen't have to bean APP because they all realize you know seniors, don't use APPS. Maybe the new cod of seniors comingthrough will us Hap pend in general, you know it's difficult for them to usean Appli watch or apple smartphone type, revise or smart for APP right now, sowe are seeing a lot more influx of...

INTERUSTMA. What do you think istriggering that you know if it's just happening last quarter, you know. Is there an influx of vcsthat have just hit that point where they're taking care of their parents? Imean? Maybe we don't know what the correlation is. But what do you think?That's certainly a one reason they themselves are looking for theirpersonal side of things yeah, but the other aspect of it also has been thisreal big increase in Medicare advantage plans and the seniors in thosepopulations and how it's based on keeping them out of the hospital.There's been a lot of high profile IPAs in that space, an you look at look atFox Likeli. Bono, other migname companies like Oscar clobor, onemedical. These are all the companies that are coming into the space that aresaying there is. You know there is a really good big market in senior not tothat people kept thinking about. Well, it's healthcare, healthcary embursement,that's a ball of hair. They did not want to touch because it's not a veryclean remursement process, but yeah ter understanding there are differentmodalities and then Seeim as center for Medicaine Service has also been very,very forwarth. Thinking about this stuff, you know: They've released newbilling codes for emotatient monitoring that are no longer connected tochronicare management. So you have a whole snew of remotation monitringcompanies coming up which redifally monitor t individialther, hardrate,thet, weeat and Paule Harks, but now they're, looking in same Wai, a secondactivity and behavior, is the new itle sign, that's something we want tomonitor. Well, who does that the only ones who are doing that right now todayis ars and no that's our tag line you kN activities and behaviors precedehoathdy pans. We can catch that, and so there's been a lot of thinking about.You really have to think about the senior holistically, not just theirvitals. You got to think about all aspects of their life, their socialindeteminance of HEALP, yes or, and all that has been codified at he under themencare system, an e Medicare advantage. So people are saying: Okay now there'sfinancial support for innovation. In this space we should start looking andseeing who's operating in the space and who are the ones we should find yeahyeah. I think there was also you know, a lot of vcs that thoughtthat you know, because of the explosion of innovation and health care, that itwas just going to be a guarantee kind of a quick win, because there was good technology outthere, and I think that there's been from what I've heard at differentconferences, this kind of PTSD around Ma- and I invested in all thesesolutions- and it just didn't turn out right. Th, the long sale cycles, thereimbursement challenges, and so it sounds. You know the companies that youjust listed, I think, are phenomenal eamples to demonstrate that it can bedone yeah and it is being done and...

...there's a lot of financial return onmaking these investments. Absolutely. I think, to your point when that wholeboom occurred in to so how was a couple of years ago. It was all APP based yeah.You know there was an ap for everything and what people didn't realize is APPis only one part of the cration you nee behind it mean you look at Liongo oranyone of those guys. It's not just a diabetes. HAPPIT has care coachesbehind it, real humans that are giving werey concentrated one on one attentionto that individual with that condition to help them change. You know thatoutcome that takes a lot of money to do that. It's not just an APP that does it,and so I think they kind of had a little bit of reckoning where they youknow, doctors are going to prescribe five hundred APS for you right. A lotof these APPs that are just languishing in the appstores, with nobody usingthem, but those haps that have put themselves into the workflow of thetraditional clinical model, put human resources behind it for the care,coaching and close the loop between the sympterm and the treatment and actuallymeasure it, everything that doing well and the Dusgri toing forward sure thatmakes sense. So, let's talk about some other strategies that you think havebeen influential and your success and where you are today, I see that you're getting a lot ofmedia attention and you're winning all these great awards. How do you thinkthat this is affecting your commercialization process? Or is ityeah? You Know Evers, ae wonderful, we love them. You know see bhe insides,just to hundred and fifty top twenty five companies in the world for AI andyeahthey're all wonderful and raising the profile of the company. But, to behonest, I don't know necessarily that the influence are in user customers.These are folks in the health care world who are looking strictly atoutcomes. So another thing that we are very proud of is a twenty four monthoutcome study that was performed by one of our customers where they deployedour product in three facilities they had and and measured it against threefacalities that did not have our product over a twenty four month periodand with our product they found a thirty seven percent reduction in falls.Twenty one person reduction and hospitalizations eighty five dayincrease in average lente stay in this private pav facilities, where lentostayneeds to be increased. That's what you want to be. You don't want to changecare, setting doing a qkr hospital or the skill Nusin facilty. That is reallywhat is changing things for us, so we just started publicizing those results and it's causing really big companies,even in the beach ofb space. To suddenly stop and say, wait a second.This is important. We need to look at it n we're talking with my caradvantage plans, wer talking to Senor group living wete, also talking withvery large health systems, as well as...

...health car companies. Out of the valley,very very big companies that are suddenly saying this is important. Youactually have demonstrated results over twenty four month period. That is agold standard in help yeah yeah, I words, are wonderful. I love them but comes every day of the week. So I thinkthat that is really important story as well, because you know as anentrepreneur- and you know this- you wear many hats and a lot of times,you're bootstrapped selffunded in the early stages. You can only do so manythings and you can get pulled into pitches and you know mediaopportunities, and you know just trying to determine how much time do you spendon that to elevate the presence of the company in the marketplace versusputting some money time and attention behind something? That's reallytangible, like an outcome study but yeah bsolutely, I mean al All t eattention is good and we you still love all that right. Of course, the RTHE study is an objective way oflooking at it. I mean if you look at some of those companies. I mentionedtheir earliest outtom studies were thirty forty people using their product over over six month period and themdemonstrating that afficates that more than anything, is what leadsto poduction and tacxess because Healthgar as as we mention, is a highlyriscovers industry for good reses yeah, they point to see that this works andyou're not just using their patience as guinea pigs yep. Well, you know, I think, across theacross the world in any vertical. You know just as consumers. We don'tbelieve what bran say. We only believe what other people say about thosebrands right: Google reviews, facebook, ors, Mus, etce and you think in in in health care that it's really thedata. So one of the things that I think isreally important to stress here is this: Twenty four month study. So not onlyare entrepreneurs facing long sales cycles, but if the key to successfulcommercialization is the outcomes data- and it took twenty four months to getthe study in place, then you have at a pretty long run rate absolutely andplan for that yeah. Absolutely if you're doinganything healthcare plan for twice the T to cost twice asmuch and three times as long but sales or whether it's deelopment or whatHapen, especially if we got hardware and the three month PLA to I definitely so I have thoroughly enjoyed thisconversation today. I really appreciate all the insights that you have. I justhave one last question for you: There are many health innovators that are inour audience listening today. Is there...

...any advice that you would want to sharewith them before we wrap out yeah? I think one bit of advice and this sortofregarding our fundraising journey is in healthcare. You want to raise as muchas you can. We did it somewhere differently. We only raise enough toget us to the second next milestone and then we raised again and then we raicedagain as an enrepreneur. That's tying you up a lot into the fundraising cycle,so you are not out there leaving the company. You know really pushing theinnovation and making the a stelling or yes, and that really takes you away if itall possible o get outside Monein early. Okay, it's better to grow the Pie thanworry about the side, lice fice. I meet a lot of entrepreneurs, a say.Well, I don't want outside inmestors because I don't want to give up. Youknow, equity in my company. It's a wrong way to think about it. Thinkabout the equity is coming with expectues, it's not just money, Thayr,bringing connections and the hope, nigheis getting bigger and having thatwar chest in your bank is going to really serveyou well in the healthcarespace, because it is a long sale cycle. It is a long outcome, study Halsin, soyou really need to bank on that. You need cant for it. It's awesome. That isjust brilliant. Thank you. So much for sharing your wisdom with our listenerstoday. I really appreciate it like you reer my fucking. Thank you so much forlistening. I know you're busy working to bring your life changing innovationto market, and I value your time and your attention to save kind and get thelatest episodes on your mobile device automatically subscribe to the show onyour favorite podcast APP like apple podcast, spotify and stitcher. Thankyou for listening, and I appreciate everyone. WHO's been sharing. The showwith friends and colleagues, see you on the next episode of coiq.

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