Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode · 1 year ago

The Curious Case of a Health System That’s Actually Prioritizing Innovation w/ Pothik Chatterjee

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The more I work with health innovators, the more evidence I have that many healthcare entities are hesitant to innovate. Between all the red tape and risks, many find it hard to see the value. And when they do, the industry generally has much longer acquisition cycles for buying and adopting new solutions.


But refreshingly, not everyone is resistant to change.


On today’s episode, we’re joined by Pothik Chatterjee, Executive Director of Innovation & Research at LifeBridge Health. LifeBridge is an example of a health system that’s truly on the forefront of innovation, and it’s incredible to hear about.


Pothik tells us about his role at LifeBridge, specifically as it relates to his work with startups and health innovators. We discuss topics like:

  • The challenges that new innovators face when it comes to finding the right decision-makers and advocates to pitch and “sell” their innovations to
  • What he looks for in potential innovation partners, like a compelling narrative, a diverse team, solid experience, and the ability to really prove ROI
  • The general process of evaluating potential partners and finding the right way to work together, from designing the pilot to transitioning after the sale
  • The differences and considerations LifeBridge looks at when evaluating innovations that are radically vs. incrementally disruptive to the system’s current M.O. 

 

Guest Bio

Pothik Chatterjee is the Executive Director of Innovation & Research at LifeBridge Health, a Baltimore-based community health system. Pothik’s department acts as the “front door” for health tech startups that are looking to enter a clinical setting and find the right partner to do so. 

 

Pothik has worked with hospitals for more than five years, with a high involvement in innovation and operations. Even in his earlier work in financial services, healthcare has always been a theme in his career, leading to his conscious switch into the hospital side. He’s dedicated to better understanding the needs and challenges of patients and providers, so he can better connect them with solutions in the market.

 

To learn more about Pothik’s work, visit www.lifebridgehealth.org/innovation. You can also connect with him on LinkedIn.

Welcome to Coiq, where you learn howhealth innovators maximize their success. I'm your host Dor roxy,founder of legacy, DNA and international beath selling author ofhow health innovators to maximize market success through candidconversations with health innovators earlier doctors and influencers you'lllearn how to bring your innovation, some idea to start up to marketdomination, and now, let's jump into the latest episode of Coiq. Welcome back to the show coyq listenerson today's episode. We have Poki chatergy with us today. He is theExecutive Director of innovation and research for Life Bridge Health.Welcome to the show! Thank you for having me Dr Oxley excited to be here.Thank you, and you know I don't want to forget to mention that you also justreceived an award last year for forty under forty. Thank you. Yes, it wasvery, very exciting and a great acknowledgment of the work of ourinnovation and research apartment overall, like Bridgehealth, that'sawesome! So let's just get started by telling our listeners a little bitabout you, your background and what you do sounds good. So if you mentioned I'mthe Executive Director for Innovation and Research, so I'm responsible forthe operations for innovation and Research Team and is react as the frontdoor for startups that are focused on innovation and technology and lookingto enter a clinical setting and find the right partner within our healthsystem, whether it's a climical champion with in a particulardepartment or our chief and farmatics officer, or connecting Whith someonesupply Cham. Our Innovation and research group acts as the front doorand we help complete the evaluation and understand of the best technology mightfit in with our clinical needs for R healthcare system and our patienceneeds as well. In terms of my background, I have been working inhospitals for over five years now, so I've been working at liferidge health,which is a community health system in Baltimore, Maryland and prior to life,which I worked in Academic Medical Center at Wogram in Woman's Hospital inBoston, which is part of the partner's healthcare system and the HarvardMedical School Teaching Hospital System. So I've been very involved withhospital innovation and operations. Prior to that, I worked in thefinancial services industry, so I did a switch in my career yeah after abusiness school. So I worked in health care, investend, banking, privateequity and venture capital investing with TD capital in Toronto, so I'vealways had health care as a seem in my creen for my very birt days, and I madea conscious switch to move into the hospital side of the business, becauseI wanted to get closer to positions and patients and understand their needs andtheir challenges so that we coeld better connect them with solutions fromthe market. So I just you know. I think that that'sjust excellent that you guys have provided a formal front door for for health innovators to approach you.You know. I have conversations with folks all the time that are like how doI get h? How do I get in front of the right people- and you know, is it thechief innovation officers? It's a chief medical officer? Is it a you know,midlevel director, for a Particular Department or initiative? That'shappening in sounds like you. Guys have made that process much easier by beingthe the intry point and kind of the evaluation or funnel for it yeah. I would say, based on my experience,that there it could be very challenging from the startups perspective tounderstand where their solution fits in...

...and how to sell an advocate for theirparticular type of technology, whether it's artificial intelligence or deeplearning or automation or mobile applications, and how talk a little bitabout some specific examples. wher were partnered with startups and largecompanies to implement those solutions in a pospital setting, but based on aexperience I I can definitely understand the entrepreneurs,challenges and struggles, because hospitals have long acquisition cyclesin terms of purchasing and at winting new technologies and by sort of byvirtue of our industry of healthcare. We tend to be pretty. Risk. Averse ista in a hospital setting where, if a particular process or technology orclinical workflow is performing adequately, then there is a biastowards retaining it rather than testing something new, because there'sobviously risk involved for patients and physicians. So I can fully you know,understand the challenges by having worked with startups from both theacademic, medical centerside and now from the community healthside as well.Well, we have ten at Life Ridge to try to reduce that challenge and producethat barrier for entrepreneurs is to have surated events like an innovationchallenge that we did last summer with Lucras Blue Shield of Maryland the carfirst group, where we did a call for applications from startups all over thecountry for specific issues that can help reduce the per provider fiction around our operational flow. So,as you might know, we we still use quite manual processesto get information from our electronic medical records over to our insuancepartner. So Lo explore ways: toouse technology and AI and autonation tomove away from fax machines in two thousand and twenty we shouldn't beusing fax mission more. We should automation the way that Google or ACISafter to reduce the fiction for us as healthcare systems, but also for thepatients ultimately as well. So we did a very specific type of challenge whichwe, based on the sharp tank model, where we have neos and leadership fromour hospital system and the Blue Crossbu shield side. We also involvedthe city of Baltimore. We had our health commissioner Dor Latisia Zerazaparticipat as a judge, and we were amazed at the reception that we got. Weexpected, maybe twenty or thirty applications we ended up receiving overa hundred applications from all over the United States and Isrel and Canadaas well. Wow Wow, we hade to narrow it down to six finalists for the GAMompetition elected a winner based on the judges and based on the pitcheresfrom the day. So the winner was Washington, DC, analytics, fern, callsocially determined that looks at the social determinates of ealth and howthey affect patient's lives outside of AU hospital. So looking at issues likehomelessness, Addiction, transportation challenges, so that our pare managerscan better treeash the patients and connect them with community basedorganizations to help ICATIONS, because we realize that a lot of the healthfactors that inpact patients upside the or hospital so the way we understandand intrigete that Entoyo pare management approach, the better. Wethink the overall healthcare outcomes will be and, as our industry moves froma few first service model to a value based paremodel in H, United States,it's becoming increasingly important for us to focus on outcomes and showthe value that we're delivering educations. So the innovation challengethat we did is just one example of how we are trying to reduce the fiction andconnect with the startups that need the needs of our healthcare system. Anotherthing that we have done within our...

...department is have office hours forlocal startups to come in and speak with myself and with our chiefinnovation officer, connect them with funding opportunities to help find thepilots to get from that six month or one year stage to the enterprise level.Contract can be quite challenging. So we are trying to make ourselves moreavailable to connect with entrepreneurs and in those office are sometimes we'llbring inclimisions as well. Jo. Give the clinical feedback that hey thistechnology is awesome. We would love to use virtual reality, headsets or ai around some typ of ambientenvironment. Those could be really good solutions, but it doesn't need ou needtoday right now, right now have a much more specific need around justdiagnosing a particular type of condition or improving our time, sothat we can be more effitient and improve our through put time. So we areoffening, more channels and more opportunities to bring our innovationleaders and our clinical leaders face to face with entrepreneurs. So that'sanother example: Elsse e third one is that we have gone through a prettyextensive process internally of identifying what our biggest needs withan anpes within supply chain within clinical areas like cardiology surgeryonchology, so that when startups come to us, we can give them a better way toassess what our annual stravegies are based, onthe organizational strategy.So a great example of this in real life is our discussions that we had withcompany called get well network, so mobile application for patientengagement called get well looked, so this is yus post discharge when ourpatients are leading our hospital inpatient or ED. In the past, we usedto give them print out SOF nanual information that was complicated,sometimes difficult for them to understand, and there wasn't really aneasy way for them to come back and ask plarification questions. So werecognize that as a pin point within our hospital system and two years agowe implemented this mobile application so that when you leave our hospital,you got a text message or an email invitation to join the Gep well loop,and this gives you automated reminders about your medication about how to signup for fallowup appointments about how to get in touch with your care team,from the comfort of your home outside the hospital and wehave seen tremendousengagement, fom, my facient population. We have seen over fourteen thousandpatients who have actively used the Gatwell loop mobile application, soit's improved communication hathways its improved patient satisfaction andfision engagement, but what's really interesting, Doctor Roxey is that we'renow also seeing an impact on clinical outcomes when you are more digitallyengaged with upcare and getting real time to keed back from the care team,we're actually seeing improvement, inpure outcomes and seeing a reductionand readmissions for the digitally engaged population. We took one yearsworth of data from two thousand and eighteen to twothousand and nineteenand found a thirty percent relative preduction in revisits to the emergencydepartment for patients, whore digitally engaged with the Gatwell looback, that's significant. You know, that's actually exceeded what ourconditinal expectations were and we think it's because of the real timeconnection. We think it's because of the convenience of having this tool andthe palm of their hands, and I think it's led to increased engagement on ourphysician and provider staff as well, because they know that there's as toolthat they can talk to patients about. So it's shown engagement on both sidesand the next steps of our analysis are now to see if we can combine socialdeterminates of health with the readmissions patterns to understand howwe can cinform our care management...

...strategy and even policy to understandwhat parts of the Baltimore population we could engage with this technologyand that understand what theire's livitations might be or what theirneeds might be al that application. I think that is incredible and what'spercolating on my in my mind over here as you're speaking, is that what what Ithink you're describing is a pathway that you all have created a process ora framework to validate problem solution, fit andproduct market fit whether that was intentionally designedor not. You know, when I think about our listeners and and what you justdescribed. The takeaway here is that this is the most successful path forproblem solution fit and product market fit, and the reason why I say that isyou know I hear so many innovators that arepitching solutions to a health system, spending a lot of resources and they're, not they're, not doing thehomework upfront to identify. What is those that systems initiatives andpriorities right? So maybe it's a problem that they're aware of that t ethe system has, but if the health system is not aware of the problem orit's not something that they're looking Tho solve today, it is a waste of timeGoknock on another door, right utly and I think, there's you know aresponsibility on both sides to yeah educated, more organized and be moreefficient and be able to act quickly when there is a good match between thepean point and the solution. As I mentioned, health systems traditionallyhave not been the fastest movers. We are not necessarily like a technologycompany like Appol or Amazon, where we can break things disruptings, becausethere's patient lives that are involved, yeah inse careers that are involved. Sowe have a responsibility as a nonprofit institution, to really test thingsthoroughly to understand the impact of digital tools on patient experience andpacient outcomes, but but you're right there could be a shit towards moreinformation sharing and being more systematic about what our biggestpriorities are, because something that I really that makes me really sad iswhen I see a very spirited, talented entrepreneur who does have a goodsolution and even though we need some tweiks or refinements they're, just notable to connect with the right decision Mako within a healthcare system, orthey don't understand how the budgeting process works and what we haveavailable in our resources and papability to purchaseand implement something. And they just don't quite understand the connectionsand, as I said, there's responsibility on both sides, I'm poliy or doing thehealthcare system from finance over seven years ago. Now I didn't have a great understanding ofwho the few decision makers were how to engage physicians in a appropriatemanner, and it's something that comes with time and experience. But I dothink that there's some secret sauce that we have discovered at life, whichhealth as a community health system, where we are able to be very clearabout what our priorities are and our priorities, as I mentioned, are aroundimproving access using mobile applications and digital health.Another priority for us is to use artificial intelligence and and bedthat in our clinical wordflow, to improve treeashing of patience and helpour physicians with their decision making process. So we go back to themarket with a consistent message and I think that helps us solidify ourrelationships with entrepreuneurs as well. Yeah. Definitely so whent tot goback to something that you touched on...

...earlier about the front door. Let'sjust talk about this. You know the reality of that experience. So you, youknow, you've got these applications. You know with these curated events oryou've got the front door where you know people are being funnel to you ifthey have something that they want to sell a solution that they want to sellto your system. Describe what that experience is likein the context of you know how equipped or the entrepreneurs to tell the story tell a compelling storybe suscinct in their value proposition. You know all of these things to getyour attention and to get your time to be able to present and then when theydo present, you know the compelling offer versus the disconnect, and maybe it may be anexperience where you said I kind of maybe I don't even understandwhat you're doing go back to the drawing board, or I understand whatyou're doing, but if you described it this way I could see it would solvethis problem better than the problem that you're saying it could solve.Let's just talk about that, a little bit sure that's a great question interms of a conversation or experience that weave had with a startup wherethey had a very clear story, and that made it much more much easier to be honest for us to beable to move forward with that company. I think there's several features inthat and I'm going to try to draw on several startups that if yeah, let's doit bit of those examples. So the first one, I would say, is a compellingnarrative about the impact for either our patient population or ourphysicians. So if there's a gripping story that they can share with us abouta personal connection to healthcare, they could be a family member or itcould be an experience from working in the industry and a pharmaceuticalcompany or a medical device company, and they had a Aha moment where ar youreo, I wher they realize this is such a huge meed that I have a unique solutionto bring it to market than nobody else is doing. That's a great pook that yeahway for us to start the discussion Yep. The second thing: That's just a start,though: That's not enough to complete the conversation yeah s thing that Ilook for is about the product itself or service. What's really unique aboutwhat you have developed? Have you gone through the FD process that he thoughtabout what the regulatory regulatory approval process and timeline lookslike? Have you done the research? Have you done the homework, the best pitch presentations that weget show clear, almost like a direct comparison of your product, yourservice compared to others in the market, and it has to be honest as wellright, prodactor service in avery singleaspect of a technology, but what about when they don't have any competitors?There's IT's so revolutionary! There's nothing like that and you're. Like ohcome on, you know. Even substitute products are sitars or thatrevolutionary you have to have at least one or two other comparisons that youcan at least show some comparison with Yeh pous understandthat you're like them, but there's something unique about you yeah, sothat type of detail about the technology and the product is somethingthat we look for as well. Thirdly, I look for team and the experience are you aseasoned entrepreneur? Have you been able to develop a software service ordeveloped a medical device and been able to sell it to a large corporationor taken it to ipeal Te Parket? Do you have balance in your team? Do you havea combination of management experience in the business world? Do you have aclemision, or at least a strong clomission, on your board of advisorsand then do you have operators who are doing this full time? Who can do themarket research, Ointo, the product of...

...velopment or be customer champion?That's very helpful in our getwell loop experience having someone who'sdedicated to life, brich health as O, could help develop the content for ourmobile applications and really partner with us. So those are the three thingsthat I report initially so the narrative, the technology or theproduct and then thirdly, the team and the experience and then the fourththing that I look for for life wages ve. Are you able to explain to us how yourproduct will deliver Roy Return on investment? So a lot of these newtechnologies can be expensive, yeah ing a million dollars or multimilliondollars and as an nonprofit hospital system. We have to be very consciousabout how we're alocating capital to life, giving needs of clinicaldepartment and for us to justify an investment in a new technology. Can'tjust be a shiny toy. It has to be something that augments are a positioncapabilities or improves patien outcomes or helps reduce costs. So Ireally value an entrepreneur who is able to show me a high level analysisof how our million dollar investment, for example in this technology, well beable to pay itself off in a couple of years and how to quantify what thebenefits are of r our health system, because ultimately, there's going to besomeone withan Irside who has to make that financial decision, whether it'sour cf or if it's t e finance director for the Department of Forth apedics orfor surgery and as the innovation team. We have to be able to understand yourthesis around that Ri and be able to communicate that to advocate on yourbehalf. So thes really the four main things that I look for. I think thankyou for taking the time to share those details, because I think that that'sreally important for our listeners to hear- and even some of it is like yeah sure,of course, but it's good to just hear it reiterated you know from healthsystems mouth directly of like yes, this is what I have to do. Hey It's, DrRoxy. Here with a quick break from the conversation. Do you want yourinnovation to succeed to change lives to shape the future of healthcare? Iwant that for every health innovator, which is why I invinted Coi Q andevidence based framework to take your innovation from an idea to start up tofull market adoption, if you're, not sure where you are in thecommercialization process. Take the free assessment now at Dr roxycom backsfor don't miss out on impacting more lives just because you have a low, Coiqspor. The Free Assessment is at Dr Roxycom back four, that's Dr Rox IECOMbackslash score, and now, let's jump back into the conversation. So so I want to ask you emergent:Companies Emergent startups are always at different phases of in this process.So how much of what you just described? Are you looking to be concrete in orderfor you to play playball and kind of entertain? That idea and how much ofthat is? Well, if you've got these things, we can figure out the otherparts together, because I think that's I'm something that I've seen havpen.More and more of you know, entrepreneurs previously feeling likethey had to have all the answers and they kind of had to have like a yearsworth of data to substantiate the you know, those clinical outcomes and soforth, and then I've talked to other people that are like you know what youdon't have to have all the answers. Let's do this together. So what doesthat look like for you guys? The honest answer is that it dependsokay, the usecase and the strategic...

...importance of the application or devicein terms of our overall organizational priorities. So what do I mean by that?If the startup or company earlystage company that we're looking at isdeveloping a solution for our virtual hospital, for example, which we have atlifebridge health, which is our call center- and we also use a variety oftechnologies, Fortela, medicine and tracking patient flow within ourhospitals and our hospital beds are being filed. That's a big strategicpriority for the hospital, so for that part of our business, we're not goingto work ot, a very, very early stage, startup because there's a big impact onpeopeagrow and our clinical experience, so that might not be appropriate. Inthat case, however, if there is a starteup, that's focusing on moreincremental change, rather than big disrapti change acrossthe system. And what do I mean by incremental change? I mean offering, let's say a medical dedvice that hassome type of new capability. Let's say it's, for example, it's a knee bracefor orthopedic Cations as well, and it helps improve their mobility throughsome type of stimulant, or is there something about the way that theneebase is constructed? Thats Superior? That's something that we would bewilling to test in our gate lab at Sina hospital to see. If there's, we coulddo a small pilot Werh, the small number of patients wor, even the employees involved with out Gatelab, tosee if there's some incremental improvement there. Another examplewhere we could really partner with an early stage. Startup could be on thesoftware side around patient experience, where we could focus on a specificdivision or a specific department that has been having a lot of challenges,engaging their patients outside of the hospital and say: Let's try this withthirty catients or fifty patients over a specific period of time, and here arethe outcomes of success that we're looking for and if it's a lower risktype of scenario, then we would be willing to engage more with the startof your partner, but that I want to put out there in terms of your listenersand your audience and the community that even those smaller pilots dorequire time, effort and resources. And obviously everyone knows clinical timeis incredibly valuable because of the patients that doctors need to see. Sowe do need to factor in the cost of those smaller pilots as well, but inthose situations, what we can do is negotiate some type of opportunity forCo, licensing or opportunity for future commercialization from the content thatwe developd together with the startup or particular instances of the software.So that's something that we're open to as well, because we we realize that we add a lot of valueas an experienced healthcare system with an active innovation department,and we want to help early stage startups where we want skin in the gameas well, and we want to be able to share in the success if you are amobile application or clinical decision making. Software shows a lot of successand then you're able to expand to fifty hospitals across the United States.Then I think it's fair for us as a healthcare system to be involved inthat success. So I think that's a really valid point for a discussion as well,because I'm seeing more and more of that, where the exactly what you justdescribed, where the health system is saying: okay, listen. We can explorethis together, but I've got to have some benefit than just taking. You know,six months, eighteen months of my time, my teams, time helping you build yourcompany and build your solution right right, make sense yeah. So one of thethings that you touched on that I think it's really important that I want toexplore a little bit deeper. Is this idea of a customer champion or evenlike a clinical champion? So one of the other strategies that I am...

...you know hearing more and more with ourwith our clients that we work with that is successful. Is that I am not goingto walk into your front door. Give you this compelling narrative and story andit be aligned with your initiative, and you say yes and we move fast and we getit through the door and then be able to walk away that you know that everybodyhas processes and businesses objectives. You know departmental goals, etce thatthey have to work on and your solution is not necessarily the priority, eventhough it was paid for and it was adopted and said we're going to do this.So how much responsibility does the system and does the the health innovator need to be a part of that solution, even afterthe sale to make sure that there's adoption and that there's some advocacyhow happening and making sure that they get the right outcomes at the end ofthat pilot or or that engagement? That's a great question. I love thatyou brought that up o ter roxsy. I think it's essential the innovationdepartment to be closely involved with the startup because doing that transition period after thesix month or one year pilot join me: Do the Handup to the Clinical Departmentor Finance or billing or Reveni cycle management. That's going to be usingvitual because there's a lot of education. That's required a lot ofmeaning and a lot of awareness that needs to be shared with the staffaround the benefits of the Tuel and that's an important value of theinnovation and Research Department through that handoff process. Because,as you have seen, and I have seen, there are instances where you have avery spectacular pilot- and there was one clinical champion or oneadministrative vice president, who was really supportive and saw the benefitsof purchasing tol, for example, where youcan look at and just coming up with an examplelik last of surgical implantsand look at market comparisons and get savings from such an implementation.But once it completed that initial pilot stage, there was maybe anotherstake holder who wasn't as involved earlier on, who has another bender thatthey have in mind and that they're not as excited or enthusiastic about thisinitial product. If we, as the innovation and ResearchGroup, bought that company into our system. Yes, I believe we do have aresponsibility, W be thorough and understand how these decisions arebeing made and Co communicate them to the entrepreneur. It can get a littleawkward sometimes because the pilot results were so successful and then wehave to explain some strategy and different decision making process. ButI do think we have a responsibility because it goes beyond just one startupor one yeah like it's part of our reputation to the overall startupcommunity and even tech community. We don't just deal with early stagecompanies we deal with midstage companies and ar is in tech, Farma andbiotak Shoa part of our overall reputation and credibility that we givea clear rationale. Why we're not going to proceed or proceed with a newsolution? And that's part of you know our culture and our message within thelife Bradge ennovation and Research Department? I think it also becomeschallenging when you're trying to grow. Sometimes if you grow too quickly andtake on too many startup partners, this risk that you're describing is morelikely to take place. So when I'm talking to our chief Innovation Officer,Dr Dangeand, about our strategic plans for the upcoming year for two thousandand twenty, were you try to be very intentional about our capacity asinnovation group, but also the strategic priorities of some of the keyplayers that we work with and again, those are of the clinical departmentsis to a degree marketing. If it...

...invalves patient engagement and patientexperience and yeah, we try to be very collaborative and have a clear sense ofwhat we can take on as a group and hut we can take on as a hospital as well. Ido think we tear some responsibility, thereyeah yeah, absolutely so. You'vetouched on a couple of times in this conversation, and I think we talkedabout it even more and some of our previous discussions about speed and moving quickly, and I think Ijust I fell off my chair and our previous discussion, you know was likeca: What a health system talking about speed and agility and moving fast and beingflexible and- and so you know, kind of describe for us a little bit about theculture within your organization and how you think that that plays a roleand your innovation success. Yeah. Thank you for bringing that up. It'sone of the aspects of our innovation shop that I'm the most proud of atlikeveulth, and I think it's part of our secret sauce for why we have beenable to implement a number of successful pilots that are showingsignificant outcomes and benefits for our doctors and our patients. I thinkit comes from the senior leadership of theorganization from our CEO to our chief innovation officer, Georgee financialofficer, where they really want to be cutting edge and not just be cutting edge with what'savailable in the market today, but think beyond to what ou be the besttechnology for our patients to really improve their care and improve theirlives. Three years from our five years from now, they're always trying to stayone step ahead, and that's really influenced my thinking and my approachas well. Yeah they're also willing, I think, to take more chances thanpotentially some other health cassestem leaders. I Would Sa compared toacademic medicine is a more risk. coverse culture, I think, being in acommunity health setting, because we want to get innovative medical devicesor pharmaceuticals or medical software torpations quickly. We are willing toreally emphasize that speed aspect and if you know some of these calotsdon't work we're willing to Pipot, which is something that's really. Ithink unique as well. A'd be really honest with ourselves at looking at themetrics and if we didn need our goals to say that this during the work, weneed to look at another solution to specific examples: Dr Oxi Yeah, our quickspeech to market and working withstartups, and how that really improved our patients outcome. So the first oneis an artificial intelligence company called rapid which focuses on strokepatients, so their AI software allows ourt physicians to determine when astroke patient comes into omogenty department. Parts of the brain canstill be saved in the hours after which I ina when a pation has a stroke, so itallows us to expend the therapeutic window to attempt more life savingstroke interventions than we could do before we implemented rapid. So we'vebeen working with this Israeli starte up now for the last three years, andbecause of our partnership with this strideup, we have seen a significantincrease in our stroke intervention service. At Life wice and we'veimplemented the software at all of our emergency departments. We've seen areally great response from our physicians as well, and we have seenimprovements in our workflow. They had one of the first fd approved aiapplications for stroke, and so that shows you that life bridges willing topartner with new developers of solutions and really bring them intoour clinical workflow, and we received an award last year for the ant ofMaryland. Thank you for the fastest...

...door to needle time, and it's calledthe Golden Green Award from the state of Maryland Stroke Centur Consortian.So we believe that our partnership with this rapid starteup really helped us twith this overd the other example, which is a little bit more recent. Sothis is not three years, but this was from last year, N, two thousand andnineteen is another artificial intent, oftelligence application for chest CTscans. So this is where Pulmonary Ambolis and patiencs says Thi Te. Isoftware looks at the cut scans and helps to identify potential cases of PDand pulmonary ambolism is a considered, a silent killer that causes up to twohundred thousand dects a year in the United States alone, and it oftenedstrikes with little to no warning and diagnosis of a case can be extremelytime. Sensitive again, eedok is an FD approved algorithm and they are able tolead the chest. EXAMT CT exams as soon as the patient is scinned, and then itnotifies the adiologist if there is something that they need to look aturgently, based on the sty Scan, run over nine thousand five hundredstudies with T E, I dog software to date so that how baball of working withan early stage start up in the AI space that has received FD approval andbringing it into our clinical workflow to show the results N, an a communityhealth setting. You know those are just beautiful examples and I want- and thank you so much forsharing the details of those. I want to go a little bit deeper in talking aboutMvpce, right and, and so as as you mentioned earlier, you know, healthsystems tend to be risk averse, and you know there's a lot of cause behind thatright because, like you said, lives are at steak, and so we can't just you know,throw something at the wall and see what sticks. But what I like, what youjust described in these two examples is something that's very cutting edge,very innovative, there's a certain amount of risk associated with adoptingthese new solutions within your system, but it's not an MVP in the sense of anincomplete solution that could do harm. So, let's just talk about that. Alittle bit yeah tell me a little bit more about what you mean when you're describing an MVP anda health care innovation setting, because it could take so many differentdirections: Yeah Yeah yeah solution versus a mobile application. What doyou have in mind when you are asking about mbps? So you know, I think thatthat in itself is part of the discussion is that I think that youknow, as we bring MVP idea from other industries right, Steve Blank. You KnowEric Reese with the you know the lean startup model you know and bring thatinto healthcare for us to be able to innovate faster in the industry. I'm inseeing a backlash of of like who I don't know. We can't you know thatworks in other industries that doesn't workwork in healthcare, because wecan't do MVP, and so I think, kind of redefimaning. WHAT MVP is for healthcare and to your point, an MVP for a AI solution may be very different than anMBP for a medical device solution right right. No, I think that's a veryrelevant question that you're asking and it's it's making me think of what type of setting or what type of support and involvement can we providefrom a hospital system to take on MVPS, even at the earlystage that could be refined further and developed with a degree of safety intosomething that we would include in our...

...clinical work. Fo Yeah, Wi oradministrative workflow, and the reason I mentioned the word setting is becausewe are in the process of launching an Innovation Center in downtown Baltimoreand partnership between life, Bridgehell, the hospital system andCara First Blue Cross Blue Shield of Maryland, which is a dominant pair inour region in Mer. So we are combining together to provide a physical space.This will have eleven thousand square feet with room for upter thirtystartups. I'm really excited about the center. It's going to launch in aboutthree months: Okay April in Baltimore, it's going to bring startups and jobsto Baltimore, and it's also boing to bring us a lot of mvps tit moreappropriate in that setting, because it's not in a hospital immediately. Ithink of this innovation center as a testing ground, where we will interactwith these thirty startups over time and come up with solutions that requireclitical avalidation. We can bring our doctors to the Innovation Center orbring the entrepreneurs into our hospital to learn more about what thepin points are. What the major challenges are, but what's reallycrucial, is that we also have the pair in the Innovation Center to help theentrepreneur think about reimbursement and who's actually going to pay foryour product. Is I provent, and we don't see that enough? We really don't.Is it the hospital system or if it, the insurance, SOS theyre going to be abillable code for your product? So I think that tack of Innovation Center isthe perfect environment for testing, mvps, refining them or rejecting them.If they don't make sense- and I do want to add that we're going to have a modelclinic in our innovation center as well, that will have a sample in patient examroom, impatient room and a FAM will outpatient, ambilatory exam room aswell, so start up, entrepreneurs can literally bring in their devices orcensors or wearables, and talk to doctors and nurses to understand howdoes my product fit into the clinical workflow and patient experience? So Ithink that could be. I hope a great way for us to test these mvps and not havethat traditional message where we're just putting our hands up and saying wecan't deal with this: We're not ready for it where it's just not the rightenvironment, Yeah Yeah. Absolutely, I think, that's a beautiful example. Ican't wait to see what you guys put together. You know one other thing that I justwant to say about the MVP Isthat as Mlad this morning I was at a meetingwith the care first team and we were picking out the furniture ishes where the innovation center, sowe're pretty close, were in January and that island, okay, breakfast to be open,an early Abrilin, would love for you to come and visit us. I would love tovisit. I would love to see it, especially with the payers involves,with the whole innovation development process. Again, I just don't see thatenough and it's a critical statecolder group in that equation. Right, so you know just kind of going back tothe MVP. fithing again is that you know in my mind when I describe NVP I'mthinking of something that is minimum viable solution right. It is solving aproblem, but in its minimal state, so there could be tons of other featuresand functionality that could be added some bells and whistles, but that if an innovator doesn't go out,invalidate the value proposition right, the product market fit of the initialproblem. It doesn't make sense to add all those other features andfunctionality, and we can do this and we can do this and we can do this allbased upon assumptions. So it's not a a half baked solution. It's a fully bigsolution in the sense of of an MVP, so there's no danger in it.But it's not something that will solve all the problems that you would havefor the next three to five years. That's something that we can add laterright and in some instances that...

...actually might be more of an advantagethat we're starting off with a smaller set of solutions rather lying to boilthe ocean, because, let's not forget the Ell Inthe Room when we're talkingabout technology and having things we already have electronic medical recordsystems through the large players like a Erner epic, that health system havehealth systems, have invested in millions of dollars and and to reclineto leverage those solutions as well yeah and trying to integrate thingslike a I or predictive algorithms. To try to you know, Leborate theinfestment that we have already made so you're, absolutely right, Dr Raxi, thatsometimes they may be more adventagous to start up to begin with just a smaller set ofsolutions that perhaps our emr is unable to provide today or maybe itaddresses a key need for our physicians, because there's too many buttons or toomany screens and too much navigation involved, and it's just not efficient,so that better to start with a smaller isset of really valuable solutions, andthen, over time I've seen this. Then they can extand and add those bells andwhistles to the solution. Yeah, because you, as the HEULTE system, may not wantall my other ideas and if I don't have to spend the timeand the money I get to market faster and I get to use the money that Ididn't spend on. All the bells and whistles to actually go to market have to have Thato Long Term Vision asan entrepreneur, because, just because life, which eld doesn't want all thefells and whistles, doesn't mean that another hospital system down the SOTmay not be super interested in that set of solutions. Yep Yeap, so I'm going totake your mobile phone sound as our Q to wrap up our episode here today. I just want give you one opportunity tosay and all the lessons that you've learned over the last few years andworking with startups and innovating internally within the health system. Is there anything else that you wouldwant to share with our listeners? Yeah? My last word would be have hope and retain your optimism,because we really do need that in our health crate industry yeah, with themacro trends of the costs of health caring this country, they are notsustainable with an rapidly aging population, we have more conicconditions more commorabidities. At the same time, we have this tremendousrevolution in automation, machine learning, digitalization. So sometimesit can be possible to goose faith and lose hope because of the slowpurchasing cycles and the bureaucracies and the challenges of our industry. Butmy main message would be: Don't lose optimism, don't lose your sense of hope.We need distruction, sometimes in a major way, sometimes in the incrementalway, but keep bringing your ideas to us. Hospitals need your energy and yourtalent and your technology. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom withour listeners. I so appreciate your time today, and so how can they get ahold of you? If somebody has some questions, they have something theywant to present to you. What's the best way to stay connected with you?Absolutely you can connect with us on the life Bich Health website, which islike which health, gotcork innovation or you can reach out to me on Linkdon.My name is Pothi Chatergy, I'm fairly active. We publish some of our articlesand some of our innovation events on that platform, but we would love tohear from you and engage with you so reach out. Wonderful. Thank you. Somuch. Thank you. Thank you so much for listening. I knowyou're busy working to bring your life...

...changing innovation to market, and Ivowue your time and your attention to save time and get the latest episodeson your mobile device automatically subscribe to the show on your favoritepodcast APP like apple podcast, spotify and stitcher. Thank you for listeningand I appreciate everyone. WHO's been sharing. The show with friends andcolleagues, see you on the next episode of coiq.

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