Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode · 2 years ago

Purpose-Oriented Innovation & Internal Adoption In Large Health Networks w/Sandra Powell-Elliott

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Many health innovators target large health systems as investors or buyers of their solutions. However, it can be challenging to know what innovations appeal to this customer group, whether they are open for collaboration, and who within the organization is most likely to buy or champion your innovation. 

 

As a start-up, what is the minimum viable product you need to have already developed to pitch to a large health system? How do we get in front of the right key decision-makers? How do large health organizations build a culture of innovation? On this episode, we’re joined by Hackensack Meridian Health VP of Life Science & Innovation, Sandra Powell-Elliott. We discuss how their health system finds strategic partnerships and collaborations, gains adoption, and how they take a diverse approach to innovation.





3 Things We Learned 



Networks are interested in strategic, goal-driven innovations

Innovation can take many different forms, but the field is now gravitating towards goal-oriented or purpose-oriented innovation. Innovation is now currently focused on improving metric-oriented outcomes, and putting a provider at the forefront of healthcare in a measurable way.  

 

Replacement cost is a minimum requirement for large health networks 

At the very minimum, health networks are looking to invest in innovations that have a low replacement cost. If that replacement cost is low, that can translate into a net neutral and then from there we can move toward a more profit-driven economic model. 

 

Target key decision-makers in large health systems

If an organization has an innovation department, those are the people to contact first. If they don’t have people who specifically deal with innovation, go to the CFO or COO, or the Chief Safety Officer. Talk to high-level executives who are making the decisions. Department directors or division directors may have the ability to highlight you but they aren’t the key decision-makers.

 

Guest Bio- 

Sandra Powell-Elliott is the Vice President of Life Sciences and Innovation at Hackensack Meridian Health. To get in touch with her, go to sandra.elliot@meridianhealth.org.

Welcome to Coiq and first of its kindvideo program about health, innovators earlier doctors and influencers andtheiar stories about writing the roller coaster of health care and ovation. I'myour host doctor, Roxy Founder of Legacy, DNA marketing group and it'stime to raise our COIQ welcome back to the show Coi Q. Listenon today's episodes. I have a special guest with us. We have Sandra PowellEliott, who is the vice president of life sciences and innovation for hackand Secmmridian. Welcome to the show. Thank you for Aveme, happy Fayer! Thankyou. So the first thing that I'd like to do is to just kind of tell ouraudience a little bit about who you are and what you do just to kind of set thefoundation for our conversation today. So my role within HAC, ensack mereatinghealth is really to do two kind of core things. One is to develop an innovativeculture inside the organization, so we can take ideas from the front line andplenishes all the way, hopefully to implementation and or commercialization.Secondly, is to bring innovative ideas from the outside end to try andtransform how we take care of our patience and hopefully dramaticallyimprove outcome, produce, cost and prove safety, those kinds of things soI get to play around both the inside and outside the orgazation. So it's alot of fun, that's wonderful! So how would you describe what's happeningright now in healthcare, innovation? Oh, it'scrazy! You know, I think it's kind ofinteresting. I think that we've got a number of different kind of veins thatare occurring. One is Innovationis all about technology whichit's not I aeverybody focuses in on it. Mobile applications, digital health,and then we have research. You know what's going on as far as neutritmentsnew therapies and how we integrate that in and how we do that fromreimbursement as well. As you know, just clinical practice, so I thinkyou've got those two kind of core things that have always been happening,but I think the other thing this beginning to happen is understandingthat innovation can take a lot of different forms. As long as it's focused on on improvingan outcome and it's a very metric oriented outcome that I think peopleare starting to gravitate to more goal, oriented a purpose, oriented innovation,very strategically, focusing in on those innovations that are going to putan organization hospital provider in the forefront of making being able to meet some of the goals.Whether that's you know improving market share, reducing cost but doingit in a measure measurable way. I think it's been a lot of hotg Bodch, becauseI don't think that we really understood how to leverage technology andinnovation in a different way other than just what I like to call theiphone mode, which is it exists, let's just do it versus what are we trying toaccomplish and how do we innovate to accomplish that? So I think that one of the thingsthat's so unique about what you guys are dooing is that you have such adiversified approach to innovation. It's not a very you're focused, butit's not in one bane, so kind of talk about that. A little bit yeah. We havekind of three banks, so, as I talked to a little bit about you know, patientoutcomes is a good example, so I'll use infections trying to minimize and reduce or evendrive to zero, the level of infections or risk of infectuanl inopatients an inthe hospital environment. So if you think about it from the standpoint of digitil, how do we leverage informationdifferently? How do we mobilize information differently to know andunderstand where certain patients may be at risk, or insuring the patientsthat create risks, for others are...

...located in a way and treated in a waythat we can do it faster, better and easier? Having said that, you know onthe digital side or dataside. We also have research institute, Thi's focusedin on infectious disease and cancer. How do we innovate around understandingthat infections are really driven from an immune system response, a loweringof an ammuned system response so that patients are put at risk sometimes likein cancer on purpose, we are trying to treat avery difficult situation, but we're actually putting patients at risk. Sohow do we understand how to know how that immune system response,and how can we mitigate the risk of infection in those particular scenariosand then also what are other folks doing other companies? What how arethey innovating around infection and reducing infection? So there arecompanies that go from antibiotic discovery and Development All the wayto? How do we use biology and bacteria thajust, for example, that into kind ofa last ditch opportunity for patients who have antiiotic resistance, forexample, so we're trying to do it from that way, but also, even from theinternal perspective, our staff members. No one understand the processis thateverything every patient goes through and that patient experience. How do weminimize any risk from a safety perspective, so we're trying to driveit to a very core Como strategic outcom in this case just an example ofreducing infection and infection, risks and really drive innovation frommultiple angles? In order to accommodate for that, so I think thatkind of ties to you know a conversation that I have often whenI'm meeting with folks, like you that are leading gigantic health pair orsystems and organizations where driving innovation for such a large Bahemuscompany is, is really challenging right. You know, you're, not you're, notflexible, generally or Nemble en you', not fast. You know so there'sjust kind of those. You know- and this is just kind of textbook stuff rightabout change in a big organization. So how? How is? How are you and hackinsackmerity and doing this differently? Because it sounds like you guys aremaking some ineros that maybe some other systems aren't well. I thinkthere's a couple of things that immediately come to mind is our ourchief executive is absolutely driving home the message and behaving and rolemodeling the message that innovation is in our DNA. What does it mean to be aninnovative organization? How do we build culture around buildinginnovation and a yeah opportunities, and so he rolle models it all the waydown throughout the organization, but then we have to as an organizationreally highlighe what we're doing from an innovation perspective, so thatpeople see that it's actually occurring and it's actually occurring in a waythat we're focused in on very specific objectives. In other words, innovationisn't just soft, it's not about. Let's build culture, Yeah Yeah, it's! How didit impact this patient? How did it I, this provider or physician's ability totake care of that patient differently, faster, better and more economical, orhow does P that employee to actually get through their day easier, becausetheir process is we've enovated around the processes that they function in, sothey can actually get done what they need to get done on a day to do basis,you have to absolutely market of what you're doing and be consistent about itin a way that really continues to say yeah. They really mean this they'rereally driving towards driving an innovative culture. Yeah yeah, itsounds like you guys are you know,...

...celebrating the small wins I wan. Youway absolutely lead up to some of those more bigger goals that you have in mindabsolutely and we one of the things hit's kind of interesting is you beginto see, I like to say, executive competition,because we have a number of hospitals when we see ideas coming out ororganizay, some hospitals really pushing a much more of an innovation oran innovation culture. An idea, it's kind of interesting, because someof the other hospital exacts begin to say, Hey, wait a minute. I want to dothat too. I want to be known for Innovation, so you have to kind of it'slike A. I hate to say it this way, but it's hard behavior. It's like right,rigt, Angr! That momentum. You know everybody and some exclusivity aroundit to some degree. Everybody really wants to join in and that's that's agreat thing. That's a great competition dries behavior right, a right right. Exactly absolutely so.Tell our listeners a little bit about this think tank that you guys are doingwith the bears den. Yes, the Bareston, I think, if we were in Ireland, itprobably be called the dragon layr or something everybody. We got this process whichwe've tried to replicate a shark take like environment. Obviously we couldn'tcall a shark tank, so we had a group of guys who got together and literallyguys, who got together and decided that th the bear was a nice strong animal.We needed an animal. I could give you a bear hug if we like those ideas and ifnot, then we can rip you to shreds kind of thing. Obviously, there was nofemale in the room at the time that this came up. UKING said thateverybody's rallied around it. So let me go through kind of how we go throughthat process. We have a lot of companies startups early stagecompanies as well as internal ideas that may require some funding or somesort of support to really get to either aproveon concept or potentially, animplementation within an organization. So what we do is we have what we liketo call prepitch sessions. So there are sessions where we bring subject matter.Experts in we actually had that company or that person pitched that idea to us,and then we make decisions on whether based on Ametric and if they get acertain score, then they go to the Bearston and that Barstone is wherethey get decisions on. Yes, we're going to find you, yes, we're going to investin you or maybe just not quite yet, and that'susually what we end up saying a lot at our prepsh sessions, which is you'renot quite ready yet because they they need to work on better definition ofthe problem. For example, how does this help us? How does it tie to ourstrategic objectives, those kinds of things, and so we get through thatprocess and it's kind of fun, because we have these, we have board members,we have executives. We have external aventure capital companies. We may havestrategic partners, like the big organizations that we buy. Things fromare working yeah, Uhhuh they're, all sitting around the table listening tothe the pitches, but everybody has their own little bear paddle. Everybody gets an equal voat of thevoting members and they get to raise their paddles, and that is like the thebe all end off for everybody as soon as they come through the door, they'relooking for their bar, their bear paddle and then they turn in their bear.You know at the end of the the session, but what's been interesting is out ofyou know the number of companies that and ideas I mean we're running at abouta two percent investment rate so which isn't actually very bad. We would like it to be a little higher,but then, when we start talking to other investment companies, they'resaying no, that's pretty good, so you're about you're about where youneed to be so, but it's great, because we really get to see how theorganization could potentially get much...

...more engaged in these ideas, and it's really super excitingand what it does is. It brings even more people. I mean it's. It's really begin began to kind of expand to other companies.Large players who are bringing companies to us to potentially say arethese companies. You would invest in because you think that there's value inthem rint a health perspective, and so it's been kind of interesting, butwe've had a lot of fun doing it. It sounds like a lot of fun and if you'regoing to do it, you might as well have fun along the way. Soluthey give us anexample of the company that you don't have to say the name if youdon't want to, but the example of a company that you invested in and thenwhat's next, you know: How did you take them through the commercializationprocess, because you know that's. Definitely. A core component of thisshow is talking about those business strategies and commercializationstrategies that health innovators can adopt to be successful, so help usunderstand. What's the process for what's next, so we've hod a companythat- and I it's funny because I' want to go back to infection. We had acompany that came very early stage and had the developed a device actually outof graduate school and then continue todevelop that over time, and it was a ultraviolet device that would enable us to, for themost part Zaparo I'm going to use. You know verycommon terms: Zapa Room in the or, for example, for any UN unobvious, microbiom or microorganismset ma exist in that room, but not only just clean it and do it it does it so rapidly. That's whatechanged the dynamic of it so something thatwould take twenty minutes now takes ninety seconds, for example, and in theor it's room, click turnover time. That is money, but it's also the ability ofthe physician to get in that room and do what they need to do. So. That's theoperation moves much better and actually were able to reduce any kindof organism whatsoever. Having said that, one of the best ways for so wemade an investment in that company when they are actually now starting to comeoff the line and manufacture those devices that scale it's been aboutsitting down with purchasing. For example, ind our network, their TIRDtheyr purchasing of pronessing, the network, is sit down, make sure thatit's very clear early on. How do you get through a process, particularly inhealthcare, where the sales cycle is so slow? How do you get through that process?What are the steps that you have to take so we're sitting side by side toget those individuals very comfortable with what they need to do to prepare tocommercialize outside of a friendly, for example, right right, R, obviouslya friendly, but these are the kinds of steps that you need prepare for, sothat when you're going to actually sell and commercialized to others, you havea good sense as to exactly how you get into the right people. What the keycells points are how you're going to differentiate yourself from the otherpotential companies that are competing in that space and get that contract andthen what's that contracting process. So it's a good example of how to kindof softly get into commercialization but drive to commercialization in a waythat helps that organization outside of the friendly network. If you will so,are you only investing in innovations that youare adopting within your system or you investing in things that maybe you haveno interest in internally, but you're commercialing, commercializing exterly,the you know it's interesting because we've tested this concept a little bit and we've hadcompanies. That would be quick...

...investments with returns, but theydidn't necessarily have strategic advantage for us, and yeah you'actually chose to pass on those and every once in a while, because it seemstoo good to be true. You just want to push it in front of the Barsten, forexample, just to make sure they still want to go in that direction and it his it's been a fail safe so far that everysingle company that we've invested in we fully see as being strategicallyadvantageous to the network not be able to implement it in our network at thismoment because of Tha Omens, tage or where our market is compared to others.But we know it's going to be something that we integrate into our network ATS,not to say that we don't have organizations that we decide notto invest ind, that we still don't push towards potentially becoming a bender.Maybe good example. Maybe we have a lot of digital health coming in we're not going to continue to investin ton of disral health, but we might want to see it as a a vendor. We mightsee that it fits a need, but it is a different kind of investment strategy.For us, IT'S A it's a it's. We want to balanceit out with other types of investments that we're making as well. So so you may get a know, we wont intest,but yes, we will become a vendor answer and quiteatly for a lot oforganizations that we work with that's just as Aprit, exactly yeah yeahdefinitely gaining adoption. So, let's kind of suggling into thatgaining adoption is one of the biggest challenges that health, innovatorsdon't have right so once they get the funding and they kind of map out theirstrategy, and you know they're going to market how were they gaining adoptionamongst providers and patients? If that's you know part of their targetmarket so help our listeners understand. You knowwhat are maybe some of the things that you guys are doing differently toincrease or fuel adoption internally that we might not be aware of. I thinkyou know there are a couple f things that we do that I think maybe it's partof our nature of our culture, but we're very collaborative in nature. So welook for people who are willing and open to being a collaborator. Now thathas a lot of different meanings, so alotted d from people, but what we'relooking for, particularly in some of the companies that we bring in, arecompanies that are willing to say. Okay, we can be flexible enough to work withyou, not necessarily customize everythingdirectly to us, but to work with us and help us get the get the solution to work. Theway we know it should work yeah and help them benefit from that learning.So, in other words saying just because you think it shouldn' bedone this way and implemented this way, we're telling you that's not going towork- or at least it may not work in our organization and there's sometweeks- that we think we need to do here that you probably won't faceelsewhere, but usually wed always have an eye towards scaleability and thosekinds of things which is critical thing. You cannot get into customizing, particularly as a youngerearlier emerging company and to customizing everything. So you want apartner and a collaborator who knows and understands that scaling andscaling wide and fast are critical issues as they're sitting down to workand try and collaborate with you, Tegn ongto collaborate and W. that's, Ithink, is a hat. You have to mean it. You can't just say it. You got to putpeople on both sides of the equation, both the company and the potentialclient a network. For example. You got to make sure that you're putting theresources there. That says. Yes, we are going to collaborate and they pushtowards a solution that works for both sides, and I can't say enough on howmuch of...

...importance there is on that partnershipand a good fit mindset fit with with both inchites. Ifyou don't feel like you've got that connection you just it's it's a sign.You just know that the right organization to work withyeah, so you know this isthat. This is a topic that we talk a lot about on theshow, and you know, there's different perceptions on what's kind of like theminimum that a emergent startup needs to have to pitch someone like yourself. You know some think that they have tohave all the answers and right and some people just don't have enough.But what's really what's that from your point of view, what's that sweet spot,what are like the minimum requirements? You're looking for and then what arethose things like? It's? Okay- If you don't have answers to this, because wecan adjess that together yeah and I think it one of the and I'm going tostart kind of backwards a little bit. I think the most important thing is: Youcannot come off, knowing all the answers to the questions or yes, we canfix that. That's not a problem. You have to be open to really trying to understand what thoseissues are, but I think that it is okay to say you know, our minimalvibal product is a. We think. APUSB PLU C can get a tod, but we want your inputon that. You've got to be able to have that core. The value propositionis that that a or that initial has to have at a minimal a minimal the abilityto have a very low replacement cost, or at least a the cost of switching from one toanother that translates into a net neutral, its o demonstrate in netneutral, it's a ging, it's you're going to stop, and it's probably the easiestway to r articulate kind of what that that minimal component is. But ifyou've got a net neutral on on a cost side, an implementation side- and youcan demonstrate an outcome- that's different, your golden, then you can start workingtowards. How do I change the the economic model to get it away from netneutral? So so you kind of touched on somethingaround outcomes and being able to demonstrate. So how much proof does aninnovator need versus? I don't have any proof yet. I've got some theories and Iwant to develop that proof of concept with an organization like you. Well, Imean there's kind of two different questions in many respects. If you'rewilling to work with US Yan a proof of concept- and we think that you have agood idea- and we can see that there are some validity, scientific validityor business validity to the idea, then we're willing to work with you as longas we feel that the impact is great enough yeah and Dcombi, even just from a clinicaloutcom or t, can be from a financial outcome or both. But it s it's to me. That's kind of e, the criticalcore, but I don't think that a lot of organizations and we still struggledepending on who we bring in to sit down and take a look at what's going on, there's still such an aversion to nothaving all the answers Ar Thoukingo everything. I mean why I'm making showtalk about this, so I listeners her it over and over again, because I mean atthe end of the day we are a risk aversive organization by nature. We don't wantto kill people, we don't want to create. You know more harm than than we andjust I know it sounds very simplistic...

...and is very obvious, but that has beenimbedded in everything we do minimize menimizes minimize risk as much as youcan and because of that you've got this well. You should know all the answers to this, and and and to my questionsand it's okay to say you don't and you'll do some further evaluation, ormaybe you can help me answer that question. I don't know how to go aboutanswering that question. Can we talk further, but again it depends on yourstage where you are in the development and that's going to be a differentdifferent answer, depending on kind of the stage o the company her mm. So do you have you, have you guys everdone any type of CO creation with patiente or with providers, and it's soto give us some examples of what that might look like for you all. We haveit's interesting because we had a physician actually bring to us one ofhis patients who developed a solution. He has actually gone througha number of kidney transplants. INTERESTINGNOUGH has been on dat on andoff dialysis a couple of times and fut. Those who may not be aware when you goon dialysis, you are, it is they're literally taking all your fluids outreplacing them. It is an extremely it's a difficult situation because youget so cold now. You can't just wear tons of clothing because you have allthese little ports that people you know have to hook you up to to get. You knowyour poditly fluids out, Yeah Yeah Ye, so some people have to be robe. I meanat some of them are in the arts. You know you have cancer patients who havechemo therapy and ey've got different locations for where that occurs. Bottomline is this: Guy came up with this. I like to call it kind of like anunderarmor type garment. That was really easy for patients to zip aNUNSIP and put certain kinds of Gauz in so that,if you know the patient had a leak after they left at the gauze would pickit up. Very interesting is and enough there that we were able to Pantis wereactually in the process of mainfractor and giving them to some Mor Transplanfaciens to get some feedback before we finalize ha design- and this is thispatience, developed solution and you know, he'llget e the vast majority of any revenue we get from it, which is totally good efor US intas. It actually helps our patient population now that we do careand we want to make it an easier process for them to get care andtreatment with us and if they come up with a good idea, we want to hear itand well, you know if we can all benefit from it, then that's great, butbottom line. Is it's a good example of a patient and a physician? Actuallywithin our network saying you guys got to take a look at this. This is prettycool. He' he's been doing it. It looks great. It makes hem feel good, take alook and see what you think and it's been a it's been a great journey. He'sloving love, ing life, he's like the star patient right now, whit. I bet soare you which that is an incredible story. Ilove to hear that. Are you all it? You kind of touched on this a little bit.Are you all innvolving other patients in that process, to see that you know?We know that this is a problem, and- and you know this patient has asolution for that and involving other patients in that not necessarilyIviation, because this patient's already done that, but the evaluation,the design and making sure that it is something that's going to be valuablefor multiple patients, not just a small segmend, absolutely so. The the shirtsthat we're getting designed right now are going to be given to our patientsfor period of time. So we CET, you know with me questionnaires- will getanswers from them, we'll sit down with them and watch them as long as they'recomfortable with it watch them how they...

...use the shirt, how they like it, howthey wear it. You know it's an interesting. You knowwe don't want to be in the shirt business, but we want to make its thatour core, but we want to make sure that whatever we end up finalizing andworking with someone to kind of get it to market really is going to work forthe vast majority of patients, and if we can make some modifications, youknow will make those modifications but getting patients engaged in thatprocess and podeveloping with them. It's so so exciting. It's so cool. Wehave a glass doing it yeah. I see some organizations, you know doing some of that. Most that are thinking about co creation orinvolving patients in the CO design. Like you, just descripe rived is asmall segment that some people are doing it like you all, and what I'mstarting to see a little bit is also involving them in the C launch spaceafterwards rights because you're, it's inherent that you're building, raisingfans, earleadocters right and so having them being part of the CO bunch processseems to be one of the ways that organizations are kind of rising abovethe noise yeah, and it really you know it really speaks to thestories yeah and gives that the stories of face- and it makes it much more realfor everybody, and we absolutely love it, because it makes us happy to seethem happy and enjoying themselves and regardless of what type of product orservice it is so and it really just it connects us in a different way to ourPASR. So you kind of touched on this a little bit, but I want to revisit theconversation and see if we tease out anything else. You know a lot of ourlisteners are health, innovators who are in the trenches today and they aretrying to shole their solutions to folks. Like you, so what are some ofthe strategies that you recommend that they just make sure that they have aspart of their commercialization when they're trying to sell to folks, likeyou yeah, I think, if you're really an early startup, I think what's helpfulfor us or you don't have much adoption at all is to really say I really reallylike to get your input on this. This is something that we think its valuable and we really want to see what's thevalue proposition and it creates more of a I go back to the work collaborative,but you're really leveraging a desire on our part as health providers. Welike to help people and it's an interesting strategy, butit works, and when you can get that time with people who say, I'm happy tohelp out you're going to get much further. So if they see value they'regoing to figure out, how do I get this integrated into the network? How do Iget this integrated into an evaluation process, whatever that organizationprocesses be open to not selling right on the gate but saying here's thesolution, here's the problem! I'm trying to solve what are we missinghere? Here's the business model. How does that fit with you? So those arethe kinds of things that you need to understand. What's the strategy toimplement something like this, what do we need to be thinking about? I thinkthe critical thing, in addition is making sure that you truly understandthat your solution meets their needs. Whoever you're talking to so trying tomake Sur. Do Your Homework, make sure you truly understand the needs that anorgaization has there's a lot of different ways that you can do that. Ithink, looking at what they're touting they're trying to tout, for example,and their annual reports, so, for example, if we want to be you know USNews and World Report Number One hospital helth network. What are thosekey things that drive that organization? Is it infecturates, reducing mortality,minimizing...

...the ability or the minimizingdifficulty and transitioning a patient from an acute characto subbic? You carethose coud of things. Yeah will understand the more you pay attentionto Wan your homeworkyeah make sure that your solution targets that in some way,shape perform or potentially facilitates their their ability to meetthose needs or to solve those problems. Everyprevery organization has different problems, but we also have all the sameproblems so make sure that you clearly understand the impact of that problemfor that organization, and now your solution potentially translates insolving that problem, so, for example, reducing costs. If youcan bring a product to me into our organization that you're saying reducethe coustic care, you've got to be able to understand that I don't care aboutreducing the cost of care to the insurance company. I do care about. Howdo we reduce the cost of car to the hospital or h reduce the cost of acopay that a patient may have to pay if they've got ou know high deductibles inour marketplace, so make sure that you know reducing cost of care, for example,or improving outcomes is truly something that you can defie specifically, thatis important to that that potential client so improving outcomes. To me, asa health provider may be very different than improving outcomes to a physicianand a Isol, you know in a solo practice, for example, or an insurance company oran HMO, for example, so make sure you truly understand those definitions andhow they impact. You know how your product may impact those yeah. I thinkthe language is really important and, like you said you know it's hard, it'sreally hard to find an healthcare organization, that's not looking tolower costs and improve outcomes, and- and you know, and so if you'remessaging strategy is that generic in nature, it's th, you know, there's verylittle wild factor of of kind of like digging into the layers of that anddifferentiating yourself from all the other people that are saying yeah, andwe can it prove outcomes and lower cost to exactly and leverage white papersand references. I mean if you've got a client even an early client. What you've donebe very clear, with what you've done with them, who those people are andwhat their role was, and even you know, quotes from them in a white Papor in away that you could actually reach out. I could reach out and say: okay, Neil.How did this go? I mean that's what I'm reading, because it is those arechritical components and in this industry we all do that we're allcalling up. You know our buddies at different locations andsaying here's what I heard. Can you tell me the story as well? I want tohear the story from your perspective. Yeah, yeah and but you've got to bebrutally honest. You've got to be a transparent and authentic andeverything you do because it will come back to my Jib, careful yeah yea, soyou kind of touched on who a little bit. So is there a single path to successwhen you think about the people right, the intry point. Do I need to make sureI'm in front of the CEO and do I need to make sure I'm in set front of youright in charge of innovation? For the system, can I go through the providerdepartment head, you know, or is there no writer wrong? It's just.It varies every single time. I think it baries a lot. In all honesty, I thinkin organizations like hours where you've got an innovation group, it'salways a good place to start because they at least have a good sense as towho the right people might be in their organization to get you in front of so so I highly suggest that, though Iwill tell you that we get inandated, so sometimes you have to be patient, and...

...just you know also, I don't mind pess justto remind me that you're still out there busaid thank you fans, personalike just for God, but I think that usually it's eitheryour CPO, your chief operating officer and depending on the size of theorganization, I would highly recommend not going to the CEO, because they'rejust going to give it to the other folks as well and or a chief safety officer, ourecritical areas to really go to. If you don't have an innovation or innovation,but usually you know, you've got to get in high level executive WHO's, makingdecisions, department, directors, for example, or division directors. Theymay have the ability to highlight you, but they are so far down and decisionmaking for a lot of organizations anymore, that they're they're not aseasy to you'. You can reach out to them, butthey're still not the key decision makers. They can make a recommendation,but you've got to get their bosses and their bosses bosses involved, yeah,yeah, okay, good. So how important is storytelling? It is absolutely probably the most critical thing and we've learned this both internallyand externally, but I think one of the things is you kind of kept toconceptualize that I don't value anything that I don't understand. So if I can't understand what problem you're trying to solve andhow your solution works to solve it, I'm not wolling to say: Oh, that's thebest thing to slishbread kind of thing, so you've got you've got to be able totell that story and a lot of times. It's about. You know understandingenough. What's going on today and saying here's what go happens today?Here's what I see happening tomorrow if you use my product or solution, a D,How that changes. So it's the beginning middle and end. It'sthe story, we're all wired for stories. We have so many different companiescome to us. We have one individual or within the organization who came up with an idea of trauma, tack, Very Trauma, Tech. For you know,fifteen plus years there was a problem that his that the physicians in thenursing staff were having with a particular device. It was no longergoing to be manufactured and it was going to cause some problems and thereason it was going to cause problems. I it was going to delay the amount oftime that blood, for example, could get back into the patient and when you'retrama patient, you have, you know Blat for Trama you're,probably bleeding inside they had systems in place in the past,where they could take some of that fluid and pump it right back into theindividual. What that does is help that individual stay alive and their tissuestay alive, while you're trying to get the right blood now because of thedevice to change the patiens have to wait. The physicians have to wait. Theycan't put that blood back in. They have to get hole, blood which is extremelycostly, and it also takes time to match you know and crossmatch the blood, andyou don't know if patients have had blood thetters. That kind of thingright, vory sure, is that this idea of the team, a TRAUMAC surgeon, anurse and the developer, came together and they blew us away because they toldus about Jimmy the patient who came in and how his life was changed and usingthis device they did that whole sharp cank love yeah right that you're, likeOh, my God. You know this is he I get this. I totally get this yeah andbecause we coun get it, we could begin to understand how we could take thisand run with it. We have tons of...

...companies that can't even get thatstory, get a story cross and we can scratch in their heads because theydon't know what you what's your product, what your Solkin Ow, what you're tryingto problem ore trying to solve and how ismy life going to be different? Yeah Cant Tell that story, you're dead inthe water, because I rigt just don't understand it enough and they don'thave time to think about it, and you know really try to understand you gotto make it super simple. Just tell the story well and is not nomnally well asa result of whan. I like about the example that you just gave this JimmyStory. Is that it's a personal story right it's authentic and I imaginewithout having heard the story that it is an emotional story, ter right, andso we are, you know we are inspired and motivatedby emotional forms, Lov with it, and I think sometimes, health innovators,especially if they're the technologist that I think very rationally and verylogical and and that rational logical story is not starring. My heart, that'sright, there's a reason. Sexcelld right, it's intrinsic it's motivational, it'semotional it'! It hooks you differently and we you know it's sad, but we dohave a lot of people that are very technology, very logical. They can'ttell that story and that's okay, yehave somebody else like the I right exactlytotally good, but if you can tell that story, you get you win the hearts andthe minds of the people that you're trying o to to sell your product orsolution yeah. So we touched on a bunch of different things today. The last question I have for you isknowing that our listeners are either hospital systems like yourselfthat are trying to ennovate and Pushin against the forces against them ortheir health innovators, external to systems that are trying to sell. Whatis what advice do you have for them? Persistence pays off. It is very this just like other industries, but Ithink in healthcare right now, because there's so much change going on andpeople are trying to anticipate. What's coming down the pike that people losefocus very quickly, so you have to be persistent e, herpersistent and developing what you try to develop and trying to go against thegrain, sometimes in culture. I've faced. You know throughout myyears I' faced a lot of cultural barriers, and sometimes you just say:Okay Gotto be patient and I got t figure outanother way you ave always got to be persistent and think I've got ta solvethiss and you know usually that persistence willpay off either if it's finally the right person to talk to Yo in aorganization whether it's getting that product or idea for further fleshed out,if you're internally within er organization or getting an organizationto put money behind an idea that you think is going to dramatically improvepatient patient lives or provideeur lives, for example. So but persistentis persistence, truly, does pay off and do your homework always do yourhomework your homework on the the organization, if you know who's goingto be in the room, do your homework on who's in the room, make sure you understand what you'retrying to do and how you actually are positioning yourself better and there'sonly one way to do that and that's through homework yeah yep no waygetting around it right! Well, SINTRO! Thank you! So much forsharing your wisdom with us today. I certainly appreciate it. What is thebest way for people to get a hold of you if they want to connect with youlater best way is through my email, Sandra Dot Elliot at Meridium Health,dot, Org any emailis. The best way to...

...reach me awesome. Thank you so much.Thank you. What's the difference between watchingand commercializing a health care Novation, many people will watch a newproduct. Few will commercialize it to learn the difference between watchand commercialization and to watch past episodes of the show head to our videoshow page at Dr Roxycom thanks so much for watching and listening to the showyou can subscribe to the latest episodes on your favorite podcast APPlike apple podcasts and spotify, or subscribe to the video episodes on ourYoutube Channel, no matter the platform just search Coyq with Dr Roxy untilnext time. LET'S RAISE OUR COIQ.

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