Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode · 2 years ago

Physician Turned Entrepreneur: A Formula for Innovation Success w/Dr. Tal Rapke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Physician turned entrepreneur. Working within the healthcare ecosystem can definitely be an advantage. It's important to understand how healthcare thinks and being a physician-entrepreneur can offer credibility for knowing what it's like to be on the frontline. On the flip side, doctors are trained to think about problems in a linear way, which can sometimes get in the way of innovation. 

 

Just because you've identified a real problem in healthcare and developed an innovation that is superior to competing solutions on the market, doesn't guarantee commercial success. How can we make healthcare innovation easier? How can we become more focused on outputs instead of inputs? How can taking a sabbatical help entrepreneurs come back to the game with new clarity, energy, and passion?

 

On this episode, I’m joined by global health innovator and ScalaMed CEO, Dr. Tal Rapke, MD, who shares his formula for healthcare innovation success.

 

3 Things You'll Learn

  • Four questions to use as a lens for creating value
  • The difference between having a solution that solves a healthcare problem and having rigorous evidence to support your claims
  • The power of curiosity: Why it's important to stay curious enough to keep asking "why"

 

In order to create an innovation that truly solves a problem on a large scale, we need to think of how we can reduce the workload and friction for patients and clinicians. We need to bring patients on the journey, think more about outcomes than inputs, and consider the entire flow of the whole system.

 

Welcome to CIQ, at first ofits kind video program about health innovators, earlier doctors and influencers and their storiesabout writing the roller coaster of healthcare innovation. I'm your host, Dr Roxy,founder of Legacy DNA marketing group, and it's time to raise our COIQ. Welcome back, cliq listeners. On today show we're speaking with Dr TaoRacki, who is the he was a medical doctor. He also was achief innovation officer at Sonofie and Moss. Currently he is the founder of scalamed. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having ROK say it'sgreat to be here and talk awesome. So I thought maybe we just kindof kick off by you kind of telling us a little bit about your backgroundand what you're doing these days, and that might give the audience listeners anopportunity to kind of just know you a little bit more. Yeah, Itotally. I'm so, yes, so I'm I am. I guess I'vebeen on quite an interesting journey of trying to, you know, I sortof describe it as a bit of a bit of an approach to understand thetrue consumer journey when it comes to health care. I think you know,I've spent many years as a physician. I've spent years on the on theon the digital side, where I saw patients trying to search and understand theconditions. I spend using pharmaceudic calls where we were trying to innovate and understandhow people actually take the medications and wine. How do we give people the samefeeling of, you know, great health outcomes, but also support themin their journey through through ill health and throughout that, I guess, entireexperience in healthcare, I've been really focused on the fact that we have ahealthcare system that was created or set up in an age where consumers or patientswere were didn't have the knowledge, didn't have access to information and a people. For the most part, we're kind of like the what we call patients, right. You have to be patients, you've got to sit there and waysand and and I've been over the last sort of years, been thinkingreally about how do we start creating a much more intuitive, impowering system thatreally ultimately helps people live healthier and more fulfilling lives. And so, yeah, I guess you know my background has been varied and not been very luckyand that's really cool. Opportunities in entrepreneurship, in large healthcare businesses and digital health. But when it comes down to I think my real passion is totry and make a dent in healthcare and help people to live, to helppeople make make healthcare a little bit easier. So so what is it like foryou writing this this roller coaster of healthcare invasion? Yeah, look,it's a great question and I think I definitely some days I find myself screamingkind of you know muffles, so frustrating. I'm not that as I'm really inspiredand I think it's interesting even even...

I've seen, you know, I'veseen changes even over the last and three to six months, where previously,when when I used to speak about the consumer experience of healthcare or the factthat, you know, managing one's health is hard, people are as likeyeah, it's not really interested. But I think there's been a real shift. As you know, we see a few things coming to the four.I think, as we start seeing value based healthcare, so moving away fromvolume and moving towards value in the US healthcare system, I think people arereally starting out to realize that that we need to start bringing patients along thejourney and we need to start thinking more about outcomes rather than just about inputs. I think innovations. Innovation is definitely a buzzword in healthcare, but Iactually think there is a true appetite to change it. We can't keep increasingthe cost of healthcare. I think we're seeing, you know, large outof pocket deductible plans. So consumers and people who are living with healthcare andnow realizing the actual cost of their healthcare in our becoming more savvy as towhat they're receiving in the value that they're getting out of healthcare. So Ithink there's been a real change, has been a real appetite for innovation.But at the end of the day, I guess I've I, like manyothers in healthcare, apply very easy formula to innovation and that formulation, formula, is the group lame or, as some called now, the quadruplame ofhealthcare. And if familiar Realis, I'm sure your listens are probably very familiarwith you is. But I would feel like innovation is if you're driving downthe cost of healthcare, if you're pretty experience of health care and if you'redelivery outcomes in healthcare. You're on you're on the right trajectory, and themore quite as if you can actually help doctors out and you can actually helpthe system out by reducing some of the friction and the workloading, need administrationburden, then really what you have is a is a truly scalable innovation healthcan so for me, I think innovations kind of easy and that if youapply that that filter to anything that we do in healthcare, I think we'reI think that's the filter that I was encourage innovators to apply to anything thatthey're thinking about. MMM, yeah, well, I will definitely agree withyou. I mean, we are closer today to adoption of innovation more sothan we ever have been. You know, I think the last few years there'sbeen a lot of talk about innovation and and so we're just seeing kindof an uptick and it seems like we're getting closer and closer to that timewe're more transformation and adoption is really going to take place. So, youknow, I'm interested from your perspective. There's a lot of physicians that haveturned entrepreneur. You know, what are the advantages are disadvantages of that?Idea may yeah, look, I mean I think at the end of day, healthcare is complex. Right there are it's a it's one of the onlyit's runny. It's a profession. That's...

...that's that we're trained as kind ofapprentices in healthcare. It's under standard, course, that you go to university. It's really this idea that you're spending time in hospital, you're engage withpatients, you're watching very in your observing. I'm so there is a there isa language. We speak in Latin, a lot of our language. Wewe need to think. There's there's complexity around financials and other bits andpieces. I think having that being able to be on the front line andspeak to a clinical speak to a physician or speak to a speak to ahospital group and even a payer, and have some credibility as someone who's beenthrough the system and seeing what it's like to be a to be to beon the front line, I think I think it's helpful. I don't,I wouldn't just sway people who don't have that experience to not jump in,but I do think it's it's important to understand how how healthcare thinks and Ithink having that physician training even advantage. That's it. I also think thatthat the healthcare system and my training, and I going to speak to mytraining healthcare. We're also trained quite algorithmically. So healthcare, you know, asan apprenticeship, as a training course, we taught to think about problems ina very linear and and and method has set of method to the madnessof met us. And Hmm. Sometimes connectionally get in the way of trueinnovation because, you know, it's you know, sometimes anything creatively in someways. There other there are other approaches, and so I think trying to youknow, as a doctor who's being trained, you know, classically,I think trying to apply innovation can sometimes be hot for some people. Thatsaid, I think, I think it's a great profession. I think,I think taking a medical degree and applying it innovatively to solve some of thebig intractable health kid problems is a really satisfying and rewarding career. And andit means that, rather than having an impact on a patient by patient basis, you can have a greater impact on a much lage as population. Andthat's for me. He is a real driver. Yep, absolutely so.You know, as a physician. You know, I imagine that you're justcompletely immersed in the healthcare system, right, and so you're identifying problems just inyour day to day practice and as you identify those, you know it'sreal. It seems like it. You know, it's common for physician todecide that I've got an idea for a solution to solve that problem and then, you know, turn into an entrepreneur, decide to launch this innovation and,you know, help us, help our audience understand what or maybe someof the misnomers of okay, I'm a physician, I understand the problem,I've got out a really good solution. I'm very familiar with this dynamics.I feel like I'm really comfortable with problem, solution fit or product market fit.And now I'm going to go to market and I'm going to be successfuland then and then reality hits, you know. So kind of just talkabout that a little bit of what's the...

...reality of going to market and tryingto commercialize and innovation, even if you have something that is superior to what'sbeing done currently in the marketplace? Yeah, that's that's a great question. SoI think I'm healthcare is a very evidence driven profession. Right. Sothey've been many promises of amazing technologies, amazing, you know, pharmaceuticals,amazing devices that have a great promise and that sound really good, and thenwhen you actually put them into clinical, proper clinical research, double blinded,randomized, controlled, Gold Standard Studies, we actually find they don't perform aswell as they as well as they they is one as we thought they would. So there is something about healthcare at you know, the stakes are high. You screw up the end of the day, you're impacting someone's life.And so so I guess is a physician, it's a really you know, it'spart of our it's part of the philosophies. We are overly cautious groupbecause, like I said, there are high stakes. I think one ofthe things that we've been focused on a Scarlett has been, when it comesback to sort of problems, solution is really trying to think about the entireflow of that system. How we how we impacting the workflow of the clinician. What is the coindicition need to change in order to apply this particular solution? What are the risks that they're PUTT into a patient? What are they? What are we taking them away from that could potentially be be have agreat impact. So if you're saying would doctor listen, you've got, youknow, certain number of hours in a day that you can perform activity incare activities. Firstly, you know we need to make sure that you're gettingpaid appropriately for those activities. But secondly, should I be calling a patient orshould I be working on this tool? Should be typing something into a computeror should I be running this particular diagnostic test? And every decision pointwe need to make sure that people are focusing on the most impactful things todrive and deliver good healthcare. And so I think as we thought about oursolution, we wanted to find a solution with scarlamit. They would ultimately delivergreat outcomes to patient. Let get along the true lame of healthcare that wouldn'tinterfere with the workflow of the doctor, would actually make it improve the efficiencyof the workflow and that and credible of automation behind behind the doors to actuallymake sure that we can deliver it in an execute against our vision. Andso I think encourage people when they think about a great solution is if thatsolution just helps one individual within the healthcare system. So just helps the doctorwith their efficiency. You've always got to think about is someone willing to payfor the due to patient health? What does it do the experience of healthcare? Does it reduce, you know, administration burden? And I think weknow, when we've looked back at all of the Lidany of digital health failuresor innovate innovations, that you know on paper we're amazing and amazing technology andbrilliant ideas. A lot of them relied on changing workflow and the value thatit brought to the system just wasn't there.

And so we are creatures of habitphysicians. We know workflow is important. You know when you've when you're seeingin front of a patient, you've got an EMR system that's throwing upa thousand pieces of content and information that you you've got a patient with,you know, print outs from Google and and lid in the of problems.You've got you near phone buzzing and ringing and you kind of got a breakthrough that clutter to really have something that's truly impactful and solved, solves solvesthose those those moments of care, and so I think, I guess yeah, I don't know if that I have a formula for for how to takea problem and solve it, but I by doing. There are a lotof things that we need to think about and I think the more that wethought that, you know, innovators think about all the elements of the system, I think they're more likely to be successful in solving those problems. Absolutelyso. So you kind of touched on this a little bit. What droveyou to build scale then? YEA, so, so, I guess Iyou know, being on the front line in hospital and seeing patients come intohospital for preventable health issues. So I took too much medicine or I missedmy dose of medicine yesterday because the pharmacy was closed at, you know,six PM at night and I couldn't get my new pills, or my prescriptionwas stuck in a pharmacy that's you know, I don't yeah, it's no longernear me or, you know, I don't know, like I lostmy prescription or, you know, I'd see patients coming to emergency department allthe time with side effects from medicines that they should never have been prescribed inthe first place, or with interactions or medications that they were allergic to.That just weren't the right questions weren't asked. I saw that on the front line. I thought, Oh my God, this is this is awful and andand and, shamefully, was completely preventable. And then I'd see it. We know as if in the pharmaceutical industry we had amazing products that thathave amazing impact on people's lives and people just didn't take them. We sawthirty percent of patients not picking up their first prescription. We saw fifty percentof patients stopped taking chronic medications for high blood pressure, to prevent strokes,to prevent heart attacks. They would stop taking those by six months and wewould see this. And then financially that was a huge impact. But justthe ability to be able to help patients, we just know it was there butit was untapped. And so I think seeing things from those different perspectivesand then so seeing how patients behaved online, searching for content and trying to understandthe pills that they were prescribed by a doctor in it in a verylimited amount of time. It is not understanding why it was so important toremain on therapy. I realized is actually a better way to help support patientswith medication management. And I think you know, when you know and havingstuff they have, having, you know, chronic disease myself and having family memberswho have suffered with illnesses and seeing it also from perspective of the patient, I've just always known there's a much...

...better way and so this has beena bit of a passion project coming from various parts of my my my professionalcareer, coming together to say we can do better when it comes to medicationmanagement. It's a over a three hundred billion dollar problem annually. It individuallyaffects people's lives. It disrupts their their ability to be parents and grandparents andand leaf lead fulfilling lives and and I think that's where it really came about. It we would we can actually do a lot better when it comes tomedication management. And so yeah, I you know, we spend a lotof time understand the problem, spend a lot of time trying to work outwhat is the system currently doing, and we went back to the drawing boardof thought. Actually there is a much smarter way to think about prescriptions thatis engaging, that is empowering and that ultimately prevents hospitalizations and prevents the Morbidityand mortality associated with with with medical miss move. So one of the thingsthat I think is most fascinating when I hear you speak is you first andforemost are talking about the problems that you solve, the jobs that people arewanting to get done and what they were doing previously to get that job doneand what they could possibly do with your solution. And I think that,although it's really semantics, it's the complete game changer in the commercialization process becausemost people, most innovators, when they're asked to describe what drove them tocreate their innovation, they start talking about the features and functionality of the product. They really focus on what it is that they're bringing to market and theythink about it from the product Lens as opposed to the Problem Solution Lens,the job that they are higher, you know, the job that people arehiring their product to do, and I just think that that makes a worldof difference. You know, I hope our listeners take note to that,because that is fundamental to being able to achieve commercial success. So, yeah, so, so one of the things that I think is really interesting isI was doing a little bit of research about you. I noticed that youdid as you took a sabbatical for almost a year and and I think thatthat's kind of interesting and the entrepreneur old journey. So how did that,how did the Sabbatical influence where you are today? Yeah, I mean,look, it's so I sort of I like the analogy of the snow cone, you know, the little sort of glass, you know, touristy thingsthat you pick up when you go to New York or when you're traveling aroundthe world, and you sort of shake the snow cone. And so inmy life I quite like this idea of, you know, I'm on a track. You know, I was a position for a bunch of years andsort of, you know, then I moved into, you know, digitalhealth, that I was in farmer and...

I did all those probably fruit similaramount of time. I so like these it is seventy each and every everyevery seven years or so, I just like to sort of stand back fromour life and shake that proverbial snow cone and see where it all falls becauseat the end of the day, you know, life short and and we'vegot to be waking up every morning and making sure that we we're focus onthe things that are important to us. And so for me was a reallyawesome opportunity first to show and spend real quality time with my family. Nowwe get up in the morning without the distraction of technology, you know,look at my kids in the eye and be able to just, you know, spend quality time with them and let them direct the day and and andthe play. I feel like we know, we live our lives in this sortof six minute increments of right running from one thing to the next thing, and so to me was opportunity just to stand back and and think whatwas important to me. And I think during that time as well in thespaces, he gave me opportunity to start thinking about Scarlett as well and Istarted really researching and understanding the problem and speaking to people. And so itwas a sabbatical, but it was a really chance to clean my mind andhopefully see see things a little bit differently than others do. And I thinkwhen, when we know, when we're in the detail, it's very hardto sort of pull ourselves out and see a much bigger picture and see otheropportunities. And so for me the sabbatical was it was rejuvenating. I cameback with an incredible amount of energy and passion to make a difference. Butthey're also allowed nothing to see things that I may not have been able tosee without having taken that break. And you know, I think I ownthe fear of taking time off and I had the same fear. So Iacknowledge it was Oh my God, people are getting ahead or people moving aheadin life and I'm, you know, stagnating and I'm I'm taking a stepbackwards. And you know, I'd watch friends and people you know move upin their careers or take additional steps or buy their next holiday home or dothings that to me are not really important when it comes down to the thingsthat are important in life. But but it is. There is this feelingthat you're standing back, people are going to forget me and my my linkedin'sgoing to go dry. Am I going to be relevant? I'm going tobe relevant and O my goody. And firstly, the nice thing about healthcare is it just doesn't move that fast. But I think, I think,you know, coming back with with with a rejuvenation to me is incrediblievaluable. So yeah, I'm a big, firm believer in in you know,taking a break, you know, relooking at life importantly and and doingso consciously, I think, the moment, conscious of what we do and whatwe want to do in this world. I think we're, I would havethe greater impact. That's awesome and, you know, I think that thatpoint can't be communicated often enough. In Kudos to you for, youknow, having the the mindset to see the value in that and then havingthe courage to actually take it, you know, invest in your family andinvest in yourself. So, yeah, I talked about this a lot insome of my blog content around, you...

...know, innovators encountering this trough ofsorrow or the Valley of death, you know, all these doom and gloomthings, just the reality of entrepreneurship, because it's so difficult and so manyinnovators, I think, think that they need to work sixty or eighty hoursa week in order to be successful right and never take a day off andkind of where that as a badge of honor and really proud and in quitehonestly, you know, over the years, as I've worked with health innovators,those that do, you know, not necessarily a year sabbatical, butthose that do those types of things, you know, eating healthy, goingto the gym, you know, this idea of self care and taking timefor themselves. Really, they're the ones that are more successful. They arethe ones that are having a lot more success than the ones that are kindof just grinding day and night. Yeah, look about I always like that.I like this idea that, you know, if you want something,if you want something done, you give it to someone who's busy. Right. So, when, when, when your life's fall with family and know, many things going on, is entrepreneur it is a full time you know, it's sort of you know, it's a two full time jobs. Right, you're right. Look, you know we spend, I spend a lotof time also, you know, wasting time. It's being my wheels andand doing things that probably aren't the most important thing, and I think they'rejust being able to stadmake every day. Is Entrepreneur and but what's the mostimportant thing I can, I can do today to have an impact? Ithink is is valuable. Look, there's no escaping it. It is itis hard work. I think it's also a roller coaster. Right. SoI sort of joke that. You know, some days I'm like you know,screaming, you know ecstasy, like yeah, and then the next minuteit's like wow. So you know, it's is roller coast and I thinkfor me at least, it was part of you know, it's taking thattime off and doing a lot of Yoga and meditation and getting mentally really clear. I think is in they would me to be a lot more quantumous withthe journey and and no enjoy the peaks and the troughs, but but justobserved a lot more not get as frustrated or is, you know, isbroken about it, because it that that is really stressful, and so I'mI think, yeah, look, it's a long game. I think someof game is some really good advice when I started on this entrepreneurship journey,because I think when initially I started I was like one of those eighty houror more awake people and kind of by God and those just like tally,it's a marathon, it's not a sprint, and I think they're definitely moments wherewe sprint. But I think sure kind of embracing that idea that yeah, there's this is this is for the long term and to get through thisyou need to be healthy and spirit of mind and and it's important to lookafter what's important because at the end of the day, right, you know, the people. I think Steve Jobs said it right when he was onhis death bed. He was like it is most expensive, you know,hospital bed in the world and really the things that are most important to peoplestanding around me. So you know that said, I'm it also feels reallygood if you can get to the end...

...of our days and look back andfeel like you've made a dent in health care, and that's something that Ijust I'd love to be able to achieve just a little bit of a dent, just making it just a little bit easier for people, making it justjust knowing that you've touched a few people's lives and made their experience of healthcarejust that much better. That would be an achievement. That's wonderful and Iknow you will. I have every bit of confidence. So a couple ofthe questions that I have for you that I wanted to kind of talk aboutthat I think our listeners would be interested in. So I've heard you makethis comment of, you know, kind of launching scale amed and three hours, and but then the idea of that the amount. You know, whatis it going to take to be successful was very, very different. Sowe kind of just speak to that a little bit. Yeah, so I'mAmerican talking about what we're doing at Scarlett and then and then to that,I guess, our pathway to how having an impact. And Yeah, hopefullythat would give you yea as to some of that. So so we knowwe're one of the big changes that's happening in the American healthcare space and reallyglobally, is a movement, like I said, towards value. And inthe past, you know, you know we had a FEEFA service model rightwhere you know you could go to a doctor and you know if your bloodpressure is managed well afterwards or wasn't managed well, you got the same fee. As a route to a system where we're we're are, we're payers,where our hospitals, that clinics, are ultimately taking on responsibility for our patientshealth. They're being driven to ensure that patients stay out of hospital and remainhealthy. And one of the large causes of hospitalizations, one of the large, huge burdens and healthcare cost is is is medication mismanagement, and some actuallyquote and say that that if it was a disease, it would be thethird biggest or third third most most expensive disease that we have, after heartattacks and cancer, hard dias and counter so medication, mis manager of medicationissues and sideffects is a huge is a huge burden M and so now we'vegot clinics. You know, you using the tools of the trade, likemedications, and give them to patients and let them go back into the community. But what we realize is that as patients we're on our own ninety ninepoint eight percent of the year right we and we're taking our meds, weoften not exactly sure what we should be doing and how to take the correctly. We're often the average citizen is seeing three different doctors across three different healthcare systems and and a system today doesn't really support patients once they leave theclinic to the same extent. And so we thought, what if your creditsystem that clinics could could use that actually helps them be doctors and helps themsupport their patients when they're not there, and so it scarlet's kind of evolvedinto this virtual care coordination for medications we have as system today that that,you know, we ask patients to be responsible for their medications, but wedon't have a system that equips them to...

...take on that responsibility effectively. Andthat's all scarlement does. It's something that the clinics prescribe. It's a newway for patients to manage the prescriptions on their phone. Now I kind ofjoke that, you know it's health care is one of the only example,or medication manager is one of the only examples today with electronic prescribing, whereyou go to a clinic, the doctor says to you roxy, which isyour pharmacy, and you're like ours. The war goings across the road.For me, and before you know that you're going to need a pill,before you know what the pharmacy at opening hours are, before you know whatthe medication is that you're going to be prescribed, before you know what thecost of it's going to be, you've agreed that that's where you're going togo and buy all medicine. That, to me is just the craziest thingin a generation of Amazon and so and and not just that, the secondyou've seen your pill that you sometimes don't even know the name of what itis that you're going to pick up and so we say, well, whyare we ignoring the most important person in the Healthcarese in in this healthcare journey? Let's give those prescriptions, like we used to do with paper, tothe patient and rather than giving them paid paper, which know we lose andand and and bad characters can can change or can defraud in some way,what if we give you a true, unique digital prescription, that's it's onyour phone, that is smart, that tells you why you should be takingit, that educates you, that reminds you, that warns you, thatgives you price comparison and that essentially makes the management of feel prescriptions completely seamless, like everything else we do in our technology world. And that those scarlement, doesn't we do this with a really smart back end that makes that weunderstand your challenges, we understand your unique issues with medication management and when you'restruggling or when you need help, we fit, we help link you backinto care so that you're clinic in your clinicians help support you with your medicationneeds, and so that sort of holistic system is what we've been doing.We know, I guess, with scarlemed and we're starting to see impacting,prevating hospitalizations in making sure of patients how prescribed medicines that they shouldn't be prescribed, giving people visibility on what maybe some other options on that that could betaking instead of this one. If it's expensive, values an issue. Soit's starting to really change the dialog and trying to increase the empowerment that patientshave in their own health. KIDJOURN MMM MMM, yeah, I'm a classI could play lost track of the question that you are so engrossed in myown telling the story, but I love it. I love it, though, I mean there's I'm really excited about what you all are doing. Ithink it's very unique and different. There's a lot of tools and technologies thatare out there to kind of that are trying to solve the medication adherents problemand medication management problem, but I think that the way you all do itis is so unique and it's really putting...

...that patient at the center, andso it's really powerful. So the last question I have for you, andI know all of our listeners has absolutely heard your accent and and so oneof the things that I think is interesting about your story is that you knowyou're from Australia and you're launching your innovation in the US market. So youknow, most of the innovators that I'm talking to and working with. Youknow, when we're talking about global strategies, we're talking about how are we goingto penetrate markets outside of the US, and and you've kind of take thatand flipped it down and flipped it upside down and and you're like,okay, how are we going to go global and how are we going topenetrate the US market? So talk about that a little bit. What isit like, you know, coming in and looking at the US as aglobal market and trying to expand? Yeah, look, it's a great question.So are firstly, I mean I've spent I've lived in this, theUS, for the five or six years of my life. It's a placeI absolutely love. It's a place it's very dear to me. I thinkit's a country that's built on that's built on innovation, it's built on it'sbuilt on, you know, belief in oneself and belief that we can allhave an impact and and and they could change in this world. And forme, that idea of you know, those ideas just resonate with me beautifullyand so I think, you know, it's always a great place to dobusiness, but it's a great place to be able to have an impact andfinds a real appetite for innovation here that may not it doesn't always exist inevery part of the world. So I'm I guess the reason we're doing workin the US is because it really is a big problem here and and andthe end the ability to have an impact is absolutely massive. So so,you know, yeah, coming into the US market, like I said,it's a place. It's very familiar to me. I know I speak withyou know a little bit of a funny accent and they're definitely words that Iuse that I still even when I go to a bar and ask for abeer, people look at me and they're like who like what? I'm likebeer anyway. So cultural there are cultural differences, but by the end ofthe day, you know, the experience of being a consumer of healthcare,the experience of being a patient, it's me as having a doctor, avery similar globally. And and I think the system here is really open tothe innovation that we're presenting here. And and I think us is actually takingsome really forward, some large forward steps towards value, which is what wereally believe in, and so it's just it's a natural extension of for usand and you know, we're just excited to be to be in this market. It's great. So, so the last question that I have for youis there are fellow entrepreneurs that are listening, healthcare innovators in the trenches right now. What is what is the advice that you have for them? Grewgreat questions. Look, I'm not sure...

...that I'm you know, I cangive. I'm sure the people have given better advice than this, but Ithink my advice is general. Is, you know, one of our weknow we have one of our really important values that we have a scarlim itis curiosity and I think, you know, being really curious in healthcare, askinglots of questions. I'm not going in with any assumptions on to yourearlier points. Solving a problem or trying to understand really being curious about whatis the actual problem and keep on asking that question. But why? Butwhy? But why? And I think when we keep doing that, Ithink, I think curiosity is just an invaluable tool for entrepreneurship. And sothe innovators. Yeah, I asked lots of questions. I would say,you know, it's the US, is a is a big market. You'regoing to get twenty knows, you're going to get fifty knows and you justgoing to keep on iterating on your problem, on the solution. And I thinkif you really truly are solving a problem, if you're lining yourself tothe triple and quadruple aims of healthcare, I would say, you know,keep persevering because you know, if, again, like I said, ifyou focused on the right things, then then you will succeed. That's awesome. Thank you so much for your time today and for sharing your wisdom withour audience. I really appreciate it. So how can folks who are listeningget Ahold of you? Maybe if they have some questions about you, aboutyour journey, about your scalimet solution, how would they get in contact withyou? Perfect well, first I'd encourage anybody WHO's managing prescriptions, anybody's abouta prescription sent to a pharmacy that's closed or out of stock or the priceis wrong, or just wants to feel a little bit more in control oftheir meds, to go and download the SCARLAMD APP that's s s Ala meedthe SCARLAMET APP and in the next few months you'll be able to ask anydoctor in the states feel prescriptions to be sent to Scald and you be ableto receive them directly to your phone. So that would be the group,the best way you could. You can get involved and experience it for yourself, but if you want to in touch with me, linkedin's probably the besttool you can find me the plays. Reach out. I love to hearfrom you. I'd love to hear feedback. I'd love to answer and support anywherewhen their journey as well. So that's probably the best tool. Wonderful. Thank you so much. I appreciate you and have a great week.Awesome. Thank you so much for the opportunity to share roxy. Bye,bye, bye. What's the difference between launching and commercializing a healthcare in avation? Many people will watch a new product, few will commercialize it. To learnthe difference between launch and commercialization and to watch past episodes of the show, head to our video show page at Dr Roxycom. Thanks so much forwatching and listening to the show. You can subscribe to the latest episodes onyour favorite podcast APP like apple podcasts and spotify, or subscribe to the videoepisodes on our youtube channel. No matter...

...the platform, just search coiq withDr Roxy. Until next time, LET'S RAISE OUR COIQ.

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