Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode · 2 years ago

Physician Turned Entrepreneur: A Formula for Innovation Success w/Dr. Tal Rapke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Physician turned entrepreneur. Working within the healthcare ecosystem can definitely be an advantage. It's important to understand how healthcare thinks and being a physician-entrepreneur can offer credibility for knowing what it's like to be on the frontline. On the flip side, doctors are trained to think about problems in a linear way, which can sometimes get in the way of innovation. 

 

Just because you've identified a real problem in healthcare and developed an innovation that is superior to competing solutions on the market, doesn't guarantee commercial success. How can we make healthcare innovation easier? How can we become more focused on outputs instead of inputs? How can taking a sabbatical help entrepreneurs come back to the game with new clarity, energy, and passion?

 

On this episode, I’m joined by global health innovator and ScalaMed CEO, Dr. Tal Rapke, MD, who shares his formula for healthcare innovation success.

 

3 Things You'll Learn

  • Four questions to use as a lens for creating value
  • The difference between having a solution that solves a healthcare problem and having rigorous evidence to support your claims
  • The power of curiosity: Why it's important to stay curious enough to keep asking "why"

 

In order to create an innovation that truly solves a problem on a large scale, we need to think of how we can reduce the workload and friction for patients and clinicians. We need to bring patients on the journey, think more about outcomes than inputs, and consider the entire flow of the whole system.

 

Welcome to Coiq and first of its kindvideo program about health, innovators earlier doctors and influencers, andthey are stories about writing the roller poaster of health care andovation. I'm your host Dotor Roxy, founder of Legacy, DNA marketing groupand it's time to raise our COIQ welcome back Coiq listeners on today'sshow we're speaking with Dr Taw Racky, who is the he was a medical doctor. Healso was a chief innovation officer at Senofi and more currently he is thefounder of Scalamad. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much fovr me rockingit's great to be here and talk awesome. So I thought maybe we justkind of kick off by you kind of telling us a little bit about your backgroundand what you're doing these days and that might give the audience listenersan opportunity to kind of just know you a little bit more yeah, no totally so yeah. So I am. I guess. I've been onquite an interesting journey of trying to you know I sort of describe it as abit of a bit of an approach to understand the true consumer journeywhen it comes to healthcare. I think you know I've spent many years as aphysician. I've spent years on the on the on the digital side, where I sawpatients trying to search and understand the conditions I spend usinfharmor Sudo calls where we were trying to innovate and understand how peopleactually take the medications and Whi, and how do we give people the samefeeling of you know great health outcomes, butalso support them in their journey through through ill health andthroughothat. I guess entire experience in health care. I've been reallyfocused on the fact that we have a healthcare system that was created orset up in an age where consumers or patients were we didn't, have theknowledge didn't have access to information and ere people for the mostpart, were kind of like the. What we call patients right, you have to bepatient, you've got to sit there on Wai and and and I've been oer. The lastsort of years been thinking really about. How do we start creating a muchmore intuitive empowering system? They really ultimately helps people livehealthy and more fulfilling lives and so yeah. I guess you know mybackground's been very anyou know I've been very luck. I at SOM really coolopportunities in entrepreneurship in large hertkap businesses and digitalhealth, but but when it comes down to, I think my real passion is to try andmake a danting healthcare and help people to live. Tohelp people make makehealth care a little bit easier. So so what is it like for you writingthis, this roller coaster of health care, invation, yeah, look it's a great question. I anI think. I definitely somedays. I found myself screaming kind of you knowmuffled Likeis it so frustrating I'm not Baas, I'm really in spine, and Ifeel yo it's interesting. Even even...

I've seen you know, I've seen changeseven Oer, the last of three to six months. Where previously, when, when Iused to speak about the consumer experience of Healthcare Wor, the factthat you know Managing One's health is Hart people ere. As like yeah, it's notreally interested, but I think there's been a real shift. As you know, we seea few things coming to the foor. I think, as we start seeing th veluebased health care, so moving away through volume and moving towards valuein the US healthcare system. I think people are really starting now torealize that that we need to start bringing patients along the journey andwe need to start thinking more about outcomes rather than just about inputs.I think innovations. Innovation is definitely a buzz word in healthcare,but I actually think there is a true appetite to change. You know we can'tkeep increasing the cost of healtcare. I think we're seeing you know large outof pocket deductible plans, so consumers and people who are livingwith health, caring now realizing the actual cost of their health carean andnow becoming more sevy as to what they're receiving and the value thatthey're getting out of healthcase, I think there's been real changehas beena real appetide for innovation, but at the end of the day, I guess I I likemany others in healthcare apply very easy. FORMALTO, innovation and thatformulation formula is the tripe Ame or, as some called now, the Quadru Plame ofhealthcare and if fomitiouave Lredes, I'm sure your listners are probablyvery familiar with his, but I always feel like ininnovation is, if you're driving downthe cost of healthcare, if oimproving experience of health care and if you'redeliveriy outcomes in healthcare you're on you're on the right trajectory morefinis. If you can actually help doctors out and you can actually help thesystem out by reducing some of the friction and the workclodeing theadministration burden, then really. What you have is is a truly scalableinnovation. Health can so for me. I think innomations kind of easy in that.If you apply that that filter to anything that we do in Dovcare, I thinkwer. I think that's the filter that I was encourage innovators to apply toanything that they're thinking about mm yeah. Well, I will definitely agreewith you. I mean we are closer today to adoption of innovation more so than weever have been. You know, I think the last few years there's been a lot oftalk about innovation and so we're just seeing kind of an uptick, and it seemslike we're getting closer and closer to that. Time were more transformation andadoption is really going to take place. So you know I'm interested from yourperspective. There's a lot of physicians that have turnedentrepreneur. You know what ad the advantages or disadvantages of thatdynamic. Yeah look at Mitk, I think at the endof the day, health kit is complex right. There are it's a it's one of the onlyit's Wen o, it's a profession that that...

...that we trained as kind of apprenticesin healthcare. It's O nte standing course that you go to university. It'sreally this idea that you're spending time in hospital, your engage withpatients you're watching ver in you'r observing, and so there is a there- isa language Y alwa speak in Latin, a lot abour language. We we need to think there's thiscomplexity around financeials and other bits and pieces. I think, having thatbeing able to be on the front line and speak to a clinic or speak to aphysician or speak to a speak, to a hospital group and even a payer andhave some credibility as someone who's been through the system and Seeng whatit's like to be a to beat to be on the front line. I think I think it'shelpful. I don't I wouldn't dust ware people who don't Khawe that experienceto not jump in, but I do think it's it's important to understand how how healthcare thinks and I think,having that physician training ois an advantage. That's what I also thinkthat that the healthcare system in my training- and I can speak to mytraining- healthcare, no we're also trained quite algorithmically, sohealthcare. You know as an apprenticeship as a training cause We'etalght to think about problems in a very linear and and and mytham has seto method to the badness of medicine that sometimes can actually get in theway of true innovation, because you know it's, you know sometimes e anythink creatively and sometimes thereare other. There are other approaches, andso I think, trying to you know as a doctor, who's been trained. You know, Dclassically, I think, trying to play innovation can sols be hard for somepeople. That's it. I think I think it's a great profession. I think I think,taking a medical degree and then applaying it innovitively to solve someof the big interactiveble health get problems is a really satisfying andrewarding career, and, and it means that, rather than having an impact on apatient by patient basis, you can have a greater impacton, a much man, apopulation and that's for me. It is a real driver. Yep absolutely so you know.As a physician, you know I imagine that you're just completely immersed in thehealthcare system right and so you're identifying problems just in yourdaytoday practice and as you identify those you know, it's it seems like it. You know it'scommon for physician to decide that I've got anidea for a solution to solve that problem, and then you know turn into anentrepreneur, decide to launch this innovation, and you know help us helpour audience understand what are. Maybe some of the misknomers of okay, I'm aphysician. I understand the problem. I've got a really good solution, I'mvery familiar with this dynamic, so I feel like I'm really comfortable withproblem solution fit or product market fit, and now I'm going to go to marketand I'm going to be successful and then and then reality hits. You know so kindof just talk about that, a little bit...

...of what's the reality of going tomarket and trying to commercialize an innovation, even if you have something that issuperior to what's being done currently in the marketplace, yeah that at's agreat question. So so I think healthcare's, a very evidence drivenprofession right, so therehave been many promises of amazingtechnologies. Amazing, you know, phamaceudic calls amazing devices thathave a great promise and that sound, really good and then, when you actuallyput them into clinical, proper clinical research, yhe, double blindand, random,ize control, Gold Standard Studies, we actually find they don't perform aswell as they as as well as they they as well as we thought they would. So therewas something about health: Kid that you know the stakes are high. You screwup y. u now the end of the day, You'e impacting someone's life, and so so Iguess. As a physician, it's a really. You know it's part of our it's part ofthe philosophies. We are overly cautious group because, like I saidthere are high stakes, one of the things that Weth Beeng, focused on asscalamid has been when e comes back to sort of problem solution is reallytrying to think about the entire flow of thet system. How we, how weimpacting the workflow of the clinision, what is the connitioneed to change inorder to apply this particular solution? What are the risks that they're put into a patient? What are they, what are we taking them away from? There couldpotentially be be, have a great impact. So if you're saying to a doctor, listenyou've got you know certain number of hours in a day that you can performactivity in careactivities ferse. You know when you make sure that you'regetting paid appropriately for those activities, but secondly, should I becalling a patient, or should I be working on this tool, shuld be tappingsomething into a computer, or should I be running this particular diagostictest, an every decision point we to make sure that people are focusing onthe most empactful things to drive and deliver good healthcare, and so I think,as we thought about our solution, we wanted to find a solution with scalamid.Thet would ultimately delivee great outcomstopation aget along the triplame of healthcare that wouldn't Interfewe with the work for of thedoctor would actually make it. You know improve theefficiency of the workflow and that and credit of automation behind behind thedoors to actually make sure that we can deliver it and execute against ourvision and encourage people when they think about a great solution is if thatsolution just helps one individual within the health care system. So justhelps the doctor with their efficiency. You always got to think about. Is SomeI'e willing to pay for MORT DO to patient health? What does do theexperience of healthcare? Does it reduce? You know, administration burden,and I think we know when we've look back at all of the Livny of digitalhealth failures or Innov. Innovations that you know on paper were amazing andamazing technology and really ideas. A lot of them relied on changing workflow...

...and the value that it brought to thesystem. Just wasn't there, and so you know we are creatures of par, butphysicians, you know work for is important. You know when you've Wen, O sen infront of a patient you've got in the EMR system. That's throwing up athousand pieces of content and information that you you got a patientwith. You know print outs from Google and and alilineof problems. You've gotyou knowu phone buzzing and ringing, and you know you kind of got Ta breakthrough that clutter. To really have something. That's truly impactful andSol solves solves those those those moments of care, and so I think I guess yeah. I don't know that I havea formulafor for how to take a problem and solve it, but I but ditink thereare a lot of things that we need to think about, and I think the more that we tat thatyou know innovators think about all the elements of a system. I think theyremore likecly to be successful in solving those problems. Absolutely so so you kind of touched on this alittle bit. What drove you to build? Scallaben Yeah? So so I guess I you know being onthe front line, ING Hospital and seeing patients coming to hospital forpreventable health issues. So I took too much medicine or I missed my doseof medicine yesterday, because the pharmacy was closed at you know six PMat night and I couldn't get my new pills or you know my prescription wasstack in a farmasee. That's you know yeah, it's no longer near me, or youknow, I don't know like I lost my prescription or you know, I'd seepatients coming to emergency department, all the time with side effects formedicines that they should never have been prescribed in the first place orwith interactions or medications that they were allergic to that just weren'tthat the right questions weren't asked. I saw that on the front line. I thought.Oh, my God this is. This is awful. NDAND shamefully, was completelypreventable and then I'd say we knowas in the fanacetical industry. We hadamazing products that that have amazing impact on people's lives and peoplejust didn't take them. We saw thirty percent of patients, not picking uptheir first prescription. We saw fifty percent of patients stop taking chronicmedications for high blood. pessure prevents strokes to prevent hardattacks. You know thet would stop taking those by six months, and wewould see this and financially. That was a huge inpack, but just the abilityto be able to help patients we just it was there, but it was untapped, andso I think it's seeing things from those different perspectives and thenso seeing how patients behaved online, searching for content and trying tounderstand the pills that they were prescribed by doctoring it in a a verylimited amount of time. It jus not understanding why it was so importantto remain win therapy. I realize there's actually a better way to help support patients withmedication management, and I think you know when you know and having stuffthehave having you know: Chronic disease myself and having familymembers who have pov suffered with illnesses and Seyeing it Al Si for theperspective of the patient. I've just...

...always known, there's a much better way,and so this has been a bit of a passion project coming from various parts of my professional career coming togetherto so, we can do better when it comes to medication management. It's a thover,three hundred billion dollar problem annually. It individually affects people's lives,it distrupts their ability to be parents and grandparents and and leaveit. Li Lead, forfeilling, lives and- and I think that's where we really cameabout it- We ould we can actually do a lot better when it comes to medication,management and so yeah, I'm, you know, we spend a lot of time understand theproblem. W spend a lot of time o try to work out. What is tha system currentlydoing, and we went back to the drawing board IR thought. Actually, there was amuch smarter way to think about prescriptions that is engaging that isempowering and that ultimately prevents hospitalizations and prevents tsememobitity and mortality associeted with with with medical mismanagement. So oneof the things that I think is most fascinating when I hear you speak, is you first and foremost, are talkingabout the problems that you solve the jobs that people are wanting to getdone and what they were doing previously to get that job done andwhat they could possibly do with your solution, and I think that, althoughit's really Samantics, it's the complete game changer in thecommercialization process, because most people most innovators when they'reasked to describe what drove them to create their innovation, they starttalking about the features and functionality of the product. Theyreally focus on what it is that they're bringing to market and they think aboutit from the product lends, as opposed to the problem solution, linds the jobthat they are higher. You know the job that people are hiring their product todo, and I just think that that makes a world of difference. You know. I hopeour listeners take note to that, because that is fundamental to beingable to achieve commercial success, so egre yeah. So so one of the thingsthat I think is really interesting is, I was doing a little bit of researchabout you. I noticed that you did a subb. You took a sabatical for almost ayear and- and I think that that's kind of interestingin then entrepreneural journey. So how did that? How did the Sabaticalinfluence where you are today? Yeah? I mean look it's yeah, so I sortof I like the analogy of the snow cone. You know the little sort of glass. Youknow, touristy things that you pick up when you go to New York or Wnyou'retraveling around the world and you sort of shake Thi snowcone, and so in mylife. I quite like this idea of you know I'm on a track. You know I was aphysician for a bunch of years, and so you know then I moved into you knowDigital Health Wen. I was in farmer and...

I did all those probably for similaramount of time like so like these git, this seveny each and every every everyseven years or so. I just like to sort of stand back from my life and shakethat proverbal snow cone en see where it all falls, because at the end of theday you know life short and- and we've got to be waking up every morning andmaking sure that Woul, we folcs on the things that are important to us and sofor me, was a really awesome opportunity, forsse the Showan andspeend real quality time with my family. Now we get up in the morning withoutthe distraction of technology. You know look at my kids in the eye and be ableto just you know, spend quality time with them and let them direct the dayand and the play I feel like. We know we live our lives in thes sort of sixminute increments, of right running from one thing to the next thing, andso to me was not Portuniust to stand back and and think what was importantto me and I think during the time as well, you know in the spaces he gave meopportunity to start thinking about Scalaat as well, and I started reallyresearching and understanding the problem and speaking to people, and soit was a sobatical. But it was a really chance to clean my mind and hopefullysee see things a little bit differently than others do, and I think when we' weknow when we're in the detail, it's very hard to sort of pull ourselves outand see a much bigger picture and see other opportunities. And so for me theSabatical was it was rejuvenating. I came back with an incredible amount ofenergy and passion to make a difference, but you're also allowed mothing to seethings that I may not have been able to see weaue having taken that break- andyou know I think in the fear of taking time off- and I had this same fear so Icanknowledge it was. Oh, my God, people are getting ahead or people mivingahead in life and I'm you know stagnating and I'm taking a stepbackwards, and you know I'd Watch, friends and people. You know, move upin their careers or take additional steps or o o by their next poliday homeor do things that to me are not really important when it comes down to thingsthat are important in life. But but there is this feeling that you'restanding back and people are going to forget me and my my Linedins Goingto godry im I going to be relevant, I'm Gointo be relevant and Oh, my gody andFirstl the nice thing about health caris. It just doesn't move that fast.Buti. Think coming back W, th Wi h with a rejuvenation to me, is incrediblyvaluable, so yeah I'm a big, firm believer in fct. You know taking abreak, you know relooking at life, importantly and and doing soconsciously. I think the more were conscious of what we're doing and whatwe want to do in this world. I think where I would have a greater impact.That's awesome and you know I think, that that point can't be communicated often enough incudos toyou, for you know having the the mindset to see the value inthat and then having the courage to actually take it. You know, invest in your family andinvest in yourself. So you I talk about this a lot in someof my blog content around. You know,...

...innovators encountering this trough ofsorrow or the Valley of death. You know all these dooming gloom things just thereality of entrepreneurship, because it's so difficult and so manyinnovators, I think, think that they need to work sixty or eighty hours aweek in order to be successful right and never take a day off and kind ofweare that it's a badge of honor a really proud, and in quite honestly,you know over the years as I've worked with health, innovators, those that doyou know not necessarily a a year Sabatical, but those that do thosetypes of things you know eating healthy going to thegym. You know this idea of self care and taking time forthemselves really they're the ones that are moresuccessful, they're, the ones that are having a lot more success than the onesthat are kind of just grinding daynight. Yeah. Look about ITII, always like that.I like this idea that you know if you want something, if you want somethingdone, give it to someone who's busy right. So when your life foll withfamily and know many things going on as Entrepreneu, it is a full time. Youknow it's sort of. You know it's a two full time, jobs right. Look.You know we spend. I spend a lot of time. Also. You know wasting time ATDspeeing my Roes and and doing things that probably aren't the most importantthing and I think, there's being ae Standmac every day is entrepreneur anda what's the most important thing I can. I can do today to have an impact, I think is valuable.Look there's no escaping at it is. It is hard work. I think it's also aroller coastster right, so I sort of joked that you know some days. I'm likeyou know screaming. You know ecstasy, like yeah, yeah and then the nextminute. It's like we ISO. You know it is rollercost and I think, for me atleast it was part of you know it's taking that time off and doing a lot ofYoga and meditation and Ou know getting mentally, really clear. I think hisenabled me to be a lot more aquonomius with with the journey and and enjoy thepeaks ind the troughs, but but just Observei a lot more, a d not get asfrustrated or as you know, is broken about it, because that that is reallystressful, and so I think, yeah look it it's a long game.I think someone got missome. Really God advice when I started thisentrepreneurship journey because I think t weally initially I started. Iwas like one of those Athour or more with the weak people and you know kindof by Guide and those as Lik Tary. It's a Meraphon, it's not a sprint and Ithink thereare definitely moments where we sprint, but I think I you know kindof embracing that idea that Yeah Thi this is this is for the long term andto get through this. You need to be healthy and spirit of mind and and it'simportant to look after what's important, because at the end of theday right, you know the people thing Steve Job Sett ar right when he was onhis deathbed. He was like he most expensive. You know hospital bed in theworld and really the things that are most important people standing aroundme. So you know that said. It also...

...feels really good if you can get theend of our days and look back and feel like you've made a dent in healthcareand that's something that I just I'd love to be able to achieve just alittle bit of a dent just making it just a little bit easier for peoplemaking it just just knowing that you've touched a few people's live and madetheir experience of healthcare just that much better. That would be anachievement. That's wonderful! I know you will. I have every bit ofconfidence so couple of the questions that I havefor you that I wanted to kind of talk about, but I think our listeners wouldbe interested in so I've heard you make this commet of you know kind oflaunching scaleamed in three hours and but then the idea o that the amountyou know what is it going to take to be successful was very, very different. Sowe kind of just speak to that a little bit yeah. So No, I can talkal about whatwe're doing at Scali Bett an then and then to that I guess a Patway to howhaving an impact and yeah. Hopefully it woill give you yeah ato, some of that.So so we know w. One F would big changes,that's happening in the American healthcare and space and reallyglobally is a movement like I said, towards the value and in the past youknow you know we had a fee for service modelright where you know you could go to a doctor, and you know if your Blodpessure was managed well afterwards or wasn't managed. Well, you got the samefeet. An as a move to a system where were were out were payers were hospitalgoods no Clinica, ultimately taking on responsibility for our patients, health,they're, being driven to insure their patients, stay out of pospital and remain healthyand one of the large causes of hospitalizations. One of the largehuge burdens, an hearthcare costis, is medication, mismangement, and so I'mactually quote and say that that if it was a disease, t would bethe third biggest third third, most most expensive disease that we haveafter heard, attacks and cancer had tist Ga to so medication. Mimanager amedication issues and sidfix is as suge is a huge burden, and so now we've got clinics. You know youusing the tools of the Trad like medications and give them to patienceand letthem go back into the community, but what we realized is that aspatients we're on our own ninety nine point, eight percent of the year right,Wi, H and we're taking our meds we ar for not exactly sure what we should bedoing and how to take them correctly. We're often the average citizen isseeing three different doctors across three different healthcare systems andand our system today doesn't really support patients once they leave theclinic to the same extent. And so we thought what, if I credit system thatclinics could could use that actually helps them, be doctors and helps themsupport their patients when they're not there and so scond its kind of evolvedinto this virtual care coordination for medications. We we have a system todaythat that you know we ask patients to be responsible for their medications,but we don't have Thas sistem that...

...equips them to take on thatresponsibility effectively and that's what scalm it does it's something thatthe clinics prescribe. It's a new way for patients to manage theiprescriptions on their phone. I I kind of joke that you know it's health case,one of the only example Omedication mangors bone of the only examples todaywith electronic prescribing, where you go to a clinic, the doctor says to Tou Roxy, which is your pharmacy and you'relike art's the war gens across the road for me and before you know that you'regoing to need a pill before you know what the farmacy at opening ours onbefore you know what the medication is, that you're going to be rescribedbefore you know what the cost of it's going to be. You've agreed that that's,where you're going to go and buy o medicine. That to me, is just the craziest thingin a generation of Amazon and so and then'r, not just that. The secondyou've setting you Pille, that your sims don't even know the name of whatit is that you're going to pick up, and so we say well, why are we ignoring themost important person in the health cause in this healthcare journey? Let'sgive those prescriptions like we se to do with paper to the patient, andrather than giving them pay paper, which know we lose a D and Badcharacters can can change or can defeued in someway what, if we give youa true, unique digital prescription that sits on your phone, that is smart.That tells you why you should be taking it that educates you that reminds youthat warns you that gives you price comparison and that essentially makesthe management of your prescriptions completely seemless, like everythingelse we do in our technology, road littl, Scol met does, and we do thiswith a really smart back end. That makes sure we understand yourchallenges. We understand your unique issues with medication management andwhen you're struggling O, when you need help, we e Hel link you back into care. Sat YourClini in your clinitions ob support you with your medication needs, and so thatsort of holistic system is what we've been doing. You know I guess Wethscalamid and we're starting to see, impacts in preventing hospitalizationsin making sure a patients ar't prescribed medicines that theyshouldn't be prescribed and giving people visibility on what maybe someother options are that they could be taking instead of this one if it'sexpensive or values an issue. So it's starting to really change a dialogueand trying to increase t empowment that patients have in their own health,caredun M Yeah, Co. Treck of the question that you areso engrossed in my own telling of this story, but I love it. I love it thoughI mean there's, I'm really excited about what your all ar doing. I thinkit's very unique and different. There's a lot of tools and technologies thatare out there to kind of that are trying to solve the medication,adherent problem and medication management problem. But I think thatthe way you all do it is so unique and...

...it's really putting that patient at the center, and so it's reallypowerful. So the glass question I have for you- and I know all of ourlisteners has absolutely hard your accent and, and so one of the things that I think isinteresting about your story is that you know you're from Australia andyou're launching your innovation in the US market. So you know most of theinnovators that I'm talking to and working with, you know when we'retalking about global strategies, we're talking about how we going to penetratemarkets outside of the US N, and you kind of take that and flipped it downand flipped it upside down and and you're like okay. How are we going togo global and how are we going to penetrate the US market? So talk aboutthat a little bit? What is it like? You know coming in and looking at the US asa global market and trying to expand yeah. Look it's a great question. Soferstally I mean I've spent I've lived in this, the US for the five or sixyears of my life. It's a place. I absolutely love it's a place is verydear to me. I think it's a country, that's built on that's built oninnovation. It's built on it's built on. You know, belief in one's self andbelief that we can all have an impactand and they could change in thiswordand. For me, that idea of you know those ideas just resonate with mebeautifully, and so I think you know it's always a great place to dobusiness buts, a great pose to be able to have an impact and finis a realappetitef for innovation. Here that may ort it doesn't always exist in everypart of the world shom. I guess what you know. The reason we're doing work in the USis because it really is a big problem. Hen and, and and the and the ability tohave an impact is absolutely massive. So so you know yeah coming into the USmarket. Like I said it's a place, that's very familiar to me. I know Ispeak with. You know a little bit of a funny accent, and there are definitelywords that I use at. I still, even when I go to a bar and ask for a be people.Look at me and They'e like Owho Elike, ianyway l, there are Cothi differences, but forthe end of the day you know the experience of being a consumer ofhealthcare, the experensive being a patient epesiving a doctor a verysimilar globally and- and I think the system here is really open to theinnovation that we'e presenting here and- and I think us is actually takingsome really forwd- SOM large forward steps towards e value, which is what wereally believe in, and so it's just it's a natural extension of of for usand- and you know, we're just excited t beat to be in this market. It's greatso so. The last question that I have for you is: There are Fello entrepreneurs that arelistening: healthcare, innovators in the trenches right now. What is what is the advice that you have forthem? Crew, re, Questians. Look, I'm not surethat I'm you know I can give I'm sure...

...the tip ofe given h better advice thanthis, but I think my advice is general. Is You know one of our? You know wehave one of our really important values that we have that Scolat. His curiosityand I think you know being really curious inhealthcare asking lots of questions not going in with any assumptions toyour earlier point, solving a problem or Tryin to understand really beingcurious, that what is the actual problem and keep on asking a questionof, but why? But why? But why- and I think when we keep doing that, I thinkI think curiosity is just an invaluable tool for fo, entreprepreneurship and sobe innovators. Yeah are sorts of questions. I would say you know it's.The US is a big market you're going to get twenty nos, your going to get fiftynos and you just going to keep on iterating on your po on the solution,and I think, if you really truly are solving a problem, if you're aliningourself to the triple and quadupolames of healthcare, I would say you know, keep perseveringbecause you know again, like I said, if you focused on the right things, thenthen you will succeed. That's awesome. Thank you so much for your time todayand for sharing your wisdom with our audience. I really appreciate it. Sohow can folks who are listening get a hold ofyou? Maybe if they have some questions about you about your journey about yourscalamed solution, how would they get in contact with you? Perfect will firsta encourage anybody, who's managing prescriptions. Anyone 's ever had aprescription sent to a pharmacy, that's closed or hout of stock or the PRICEISwrong, or just wants to feel a little bit more in control of them meds to goand download the scalamed, a that's Scala, med, the SCALARMET APP and inthe next few months, you'll be able to ask any doctor in the states for yourprescriptions to be sent to Scol and ten Nou. He haves receive them directlyto your phone, so that would be the g the best way you can. You can getinvolved and experience it for yourself, but if you wantto in touch with me,linkedinto, probably the best tooll you can find me there please reach out.I love to hear from you. I love to Oyour feedback. I'd love to answer andsupport anyone on their journey as well. So that's probably the best allwonderful! Thank you so much. I appreciate you and have a great weekorsome! Thank you so much the oportunity to Shar Roxi Ba, but what's the difference between watchingand commercializing a health care novation many people will watch a newproduct. Few will commercialize it to learn the difference between latchand commercialization and to watch past episodes of the show head to our videoshow page at Dr Roxycom. Thank so much for watching and listening to the showyou can subscribe to the latest episodes on your favorite podcast, APPlike apple podcasts and spotify, or subscribe to the video episodes on ourYoutube Channel, no matter the platform...

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