Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode · 2 years ago

Physician Co-Creation, Multi-Sided Markets & Planning Early for Commercialization w/Robbie Cape and Brad Younggren

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Many innovators lead with their technology in their creation process, and in the process they leave behind the other important building blocks of a strong business. How do we avoid building a business with a singular muscle? How can we deal with the biggest barrier to successful commercialization? How can we get physicians involved in the ideation process, and what difference can that make? 

On this episode, we’re joined by the CEO and Chief Medical Officer of 98point6, Robbie Cape and Brad Younggren, who share their journey to commercialization and lessons learned.

 

3 Things We Learned 

The biggest mistake innovators make 

Many innovators lead with a technology and end up with that as the singular muscle behind the business. One of the things 98point6 got right is that they developed 4 core muscles in the business: the medical, technology, regulatory & compliance, and commercial muscle.  


How to build relationships with physicians 

When it comes to building strong relationships with physicians, we must look at doctors as a separate audience segment, understanding the problems they have and delivering a strong value prop to them as we would with any customer. 


How to get into healthcare and win the favor of stakeholders 

There’s a huge difference between coming into the healthcare industry as a competitor, and coming into the industry with the intention to find the right stakeholders and people and support their vision and goal. It’s more powerful to sit alongside the primary care community so that you’re not treated as a competitor. 


Innovators often focus mostly on raising money and building the technology. They think the vision, mission, values, culture and employee engagement are things that can be built-in down the road. The problem is, they miss the benefits of building these things into the system early on. In order to successfully commercialize, it helps to be deeply integrated with the people who will eventually become your customers and pay for your service. You do that by thinking beyond the technology and considering the greater ecosystem and stakeholders who are critical to your business. 

Welcome to Coiq and first of its kindvideo program about health, innovators earlier doctors and influencers, andthey are stories about writing the roller coaster of health care andovation. I'm your host Dotor Roxy, founder of Legacy, DNA marketing groupand it's time to raise our COIQ welcome back Coiq with a nerse ontoday's show. We have Robbie cake with us and Betbrad youngern, the two two ofthe mines behind ninety eight point: six, and I'm really excited about thisepisode. They are doing some incredible things and I will let them tell you alittle bit more about it, but welcome to the show. Thank you so much it',it's wonderful to be here with you! Thank you. I think that you guys aredoing something really amazing, because you have instead of leading with atechnology. You are leading with a problem that youwere solving, that's just being enbabled by technology, and I thinkthat that's just brilliant and you're addressing a big challenge that we havein the marketplace of primary care access. So I can't wait to have thisconversation with you today, so just to get US started just in case ourlisteners. Don't know who you are Robbi tell us a little bit about you and yourbackground, so I'm originally Canadian as it turns out. I grew up in a singlepayer system and I ended up going to school in theUnited States. I went to school in New Jersey right after graduation. I came out hereto Pacific northwest to work for Microsoft. I thought I'dwork for Microsot for three years and then start my own business, but mythree year plan turned into twelve years and Microsoft and just amazinglearning and a lot of fun. Finally, two thousand and five I leftMicrosoft and founded a company called Cozy. That's in the business of helpingfamilies manage the day today, chaos of family life sold that to time mourner in twothosandad fourteen and then in two thousand and fifteen got together withmy cofounder here at ninety point: Six and began this new adventure and the restis the history of ninety point, six, which I'm fur wi'll get into yeah.Absolutely great, and what about you brad tell us a little bit about yourbackground on as well, so I'm Goan ta mergency position bybackground. I went to the military medical school primarily interested indisaster. An humanitar medicine found myself deeply involved n evaluating howmedical devices could scale in the battlefield became very interested inin the field of digital care and how that could impact saving lives aftergetting out of the army after a number of involuntear vacation opportunities,sort of moved into the gigual Al Care, space and Hav been never really looked back.Beut involved in a number of device companies as cheaf medical officer,most recently, company called C health down in Lahoya. My first company was aone called Novasante, which was the first fd prove medical device in thecountry was an alvesound pro plugged into a window's phone, and we know thepredicate systems for medical devices with smartphone technology, and so I'vebeen with nine tint six since the beginning of January, two thousand andseventeen how build the clinic and get us ready to see our first patient andFebruary of that same year and e been ever since I'm excited to be on theshow. That's great! Thank you. So so, let's just kind of level set here.Where are you in the commercialization process? Do you have paying customersnow or you still in the launch process? Well we're very much in thecommercialization, like D, deep into the process we launched commercially inJanuary of two thousand and seventeen okay. You know when we came into twothousand and seventeen we didn't have a single pain corporation on the platform we now have over seventy paying corporations on theplatform, as it turns out close to twenty five percent of those very largecompanies. A these are companies with typically over two thousand employees.Over twenty five percent of them are actually in the health care business,which is something we're super proud of. So it's Beend, it's Tust, Monterful, tosee healthcare companies be very, very early movers in offering ninetyt pointsix to their employees, yeah, absolutely so. So what was it like? Getting yourfirst customers, you know it's always hard to win your first customer when you'rea start up. You know we have this same here, which is that everyone wants tobe first to be second...

...and it's just. It is just a back oflife. I don't think it only goes to you know commercial endeavors. I thinkthere's a lot of people out there in life in general, who like to be firstto be. Second, it takes a certain amount of of sort of adventure seeking to want tobe one of the first adoptors of a new platform, as it turns out our firstcustomer. We are very fortunate, and this is typically what happens whenyou're, when you're getting out to kate. Our first customer was actually one ofour investors. It was an investor who had a company with a few hundred employeesand he was kind enough, and you know I think, I'd even go so Faras to say thatyou know he might not have been a customer of ours, if not for the factthat he was an investor, but it gave us the ability to develop the experience a deployment, and you know you need afirst apploiyment, because you need an opportunity to relentlessly improve andget the you know, get the experience right forboth of the both the employer and for the patients who are ultimately goingto be taking advantage of the service. O was a great great experience and youknow just less than a year and a half later, you know, we've got over seventyof them. That's Great Yeah! That's that is such a huge hurdle justgetting that first, paying customer a lot of the innovators that I talked to.You know talk about it with chicken out the egg right, no e, it's really hardto find the people that want to be the first, especially in health care and a veryrisk averse industry yeah. We we actually implemented a pretty cool concept: variear LONC, so a commercialleader was one of our first employees on our seven full time. Employee was acommercial leader for the organization, and this is a good, solid. Two and ahalf years before we were even ready to commercialize. So this is back in intwo thousand and fifteen. You know we brought this individual on board. Hisname was stepen herwittzs and he put together this early development partnerprogram where we had about fifteen employers in the Seattle area, who allhelped us build the product and gave us peedback very early on on the features that we were buildingand the types of deployments that we would do now. There was no commitment,they were just sitting around the table and giving us feedback, and in fact, ifyou look at the first year of deployments, almost eighty percent of those earlydevelopment partners ended up deciding to deploy the product to theiremployees. So you know I'd say that that program was very effective andhelping us getting many of those early deployments. So I just I think that that is justbrilliant and it's so contradictory to what I hear in the marketplace. So I doa lot of educating around the fact that launching an innovationand commercializing an innovation is to very different processes, and thatwatch is part of commercialization, but commercialization starts way earlierthan latch, and it continues way after launch and not a lot of innovators, getthat. So what motivated you to invest in someone that was a commercial leaderso early in the process? How did you identify that need? That's. You know, that's a really goodquestion and it turns out that that there's a lot of things that we'redoing here at tenty point six that are very unconventional Unyou, know unusual,and I think that it's largely dew to the fact- and you know Bradcan- cantalk about this. From his experience, then, we've put together an executiveteam that is literally ever simple. One of theexecutives on this team is is covered with scar tissue. You know they've,they, you know in the case of Brad, you know, Brad actually has some morewounds for the rest of us. Arerenlas are are alittle bit more virtual yeah. You know, but it's incredible. Whattwenty years of experience will bring to the methodologies that you employ tolaunch a business? You know one of the very early thingsthat we decided to do and I'd say that this was a result of of my co founderand I and first few executives Ho. We...

...hire really having bit through thisexperience of of working at companies that had singular muscles. You know youknow you look at companies and, typically you know, a company will havea technology muscle and that'll be very clear that that's their main muscle,sometimes you'll meet companies, and I'm sure you know Brad has seencompanies that really had a really strong medical muscle and that was attheir cor. You know medical or research, but you know this is very common to create businesseswith singular muscles. You know you want to be focused and you want to bestrong and you want to be good and we recognized in the business that we were entering,that we were going to have to build a company that had four muscles and thenwe were going to have to develop those muscles from the very very beginning.One of the muscles is technology. It's true, but one of the muscles is alsomedical. You know it's a major muscle for our company, one of the musclesthat we developed very early on, like literally our our fourth or Fif fulltime higher, was on the regular twarin complianceBro. We hired a fulltime attorney who had a specialty in healthcare relatedlaw to build our our regulatory and compliance muscle, and then lastly, wemade the decision that for us to build successful, scalable business that weneeded to have a commercial muscle, we needed to be deeply integrated with thepeople, who would eventually be our customers, who would eventually be the people whowould pay for the service and that turned out to be selfinsuredemployers, and so our seven full time higher was someone who would focus allof their time developing those relationships. So that is so true and it's sochallenging. I just it's so challenging for healthinnovators because, as you know, in the beginning, resources are are slim and,and so that is it's not expensive. I mean it's notcheap to hire for those for those muscles right. It costs TSOM money. It's basically,you know a big bet and a big investment that you're making into the future ofthe company. There's one ote layer to it, which is probably worthhighlighting, is early on when I started talking to Robbie about comingon N. ninety point: six, a chief medical officer, seeing theconversations around the development of the four muscles and additionally, thisnotion that over half of the technologist in the company were goingto be focused on the physician facing side of the technology. That investmentand the physician technology was something at Nasteam the market andreally helpful in terms of hiring a building. Our physician medical culturehaving a deep Intervov in a relationship between the softhwareengineers, product development team and the medical team has been incrediblyvaluable for us to scale as fast that we've been able to mm yeah absolutelyit'. So let's talk a little bit about that. We're kind of on the fringes aboutproduct, co creation and it sounds like that's really fundamental to part ofYour Business, and so let's just talk about you know that co creation processfor you. How did you include them and who didyou include? You want to talk abouth, Tham sure I could talk about thephysician side for sure. I think that what we're doing with our physiciangroup that we call the corpolonitions is unique at the market and sort ofanswers. At least part of your question perfectly, so our positions to reallydeliver the high quality care that we wanted to at ninety point. Six acrossthe country across fifty one license boundaries. We decided that we wee t o take a verydifferent approach to delivering Physitian care on the platform, so, asopposed to most technology platforms that Hirhe locomtenems or parttimephysicians to operate on the platform, almost independent of the rest of theorganization, we took a completely different approach. We hired ourclinish ands pull time in Nineei point six, so the day would be deeplyinvested in a corporate culture that weere building with our coure valuesand to make sure they're fundamentally aligned with us in our mission and thenon top of that. All of our physicians have a percentage of time ahout twentypercent dedicated for nonclinical activities, so that frees them up theimpact on multiple dimensions across the entire company which, on theposition side, is a big pleaser. They like to feel like they can be part ofthe PRID development, recruiting UX research and design,really any domate, and you could think of within the context of the company,and that helps so also Ho that technologist get a perspective. Aphysician perspective very fast. When we have a question about what wouldphysicians think about something? We ask our own internal physicians, whichnow is over north of twenty five in house physician, Doour, full time howto help us develop the product every...

...day and and th head and that that same sort of intigrationthat happens across all of the muscles. So wheneverwe're building a new capability in the product, I think R, our launch ofpediatrics earlier this year is a great great testimony to this sort ofinterweving of the muscles across the company. We literally had to have everyyou know, senior people from every single muscle in the room aswe were, defining our role out of pediatrics, like obviously ther, weredeep, deep considerations on the Medil Front, but there were also so inrediblycomflex issues to be grappled with on the regulatoryand Compliance Front. The way you treat pediatrics and the way you flowinformation related to pediatric visits is different in every one of the fiftyone turisdictions that we're in in every fifty state in DC. The rules aredifferent, and so those considerations had to get wilven in. There weredifferent considerations for each of our commercial customers related to howthey consider PDACRICTS as part of their membership and how they definethose people, and obviously it was deep de consideration on the technology fronaround how we were going to built Thi smution and build out the capabilitiesthat were going to make the experience comfortable. For you know a a two year old or a fiveyear old or even a fifteen or sixteen year old, all of whom are are PEDACTIpatients and yet clearly, all of Thom have very very different capabilitieswhen it comes to interacting with technology yeah. I remember when my three year oldniece was showing me how to use the IPAD they're pretty darn advanced. Aren'tthey so you know how impactful would you saythat getting physician input early in that idiation process? How do you thinkthat that's been impact fuor? How do you think that shaped who? Ninety eight point six is today? I think it's pour at part of the cortof what makes us different than anyone else you could find in the market. Justfundamentally it. It is really created a culturewhere physicians are very excited to co, work for as Wehave a very largepipeline now or fortunate n that in that regard, and that's great to see where that thecompany is really on a mission to reallyy, deliver primary care so thatno one has to make a financial trade off to get primar care. The UnitedStates actually globally, but there's also another mission which its sort ofsaving primary care. It's in a crisis, ifposition community is feeling thisdeeply and as Physitians come across our companyand discover the focus in intention. We have around physician quality of life,physician culture, it just believes across the entire company M, Yeah N. Itmean it just. It seems like that, would trickle down to like employee satisfaction and customersatisfaction. You know with the experience and employee satisfaction,both with the culture and their ability to have impact, as well as just theirexperience coming to work every day or stay in where they are at work today,every day it absolutely does you know we have asaying. Actually it was lent to us by one of our board members, which is thatculture is not the most important thing. It's the only thing and our mission that that Brad articulated is absolutely central to that culture thatwe've created where we're a mission driven company like yes, we are, you, know,building a a profitable, commercially, exciting corporation. Yes,that is important, and we happen to also believe that, by virtue of thework that we're doing, we can make the world a better place and ensure that every human on thissort of has access to IG quality primary care without ever needing tomake a financial trade off to get it yeah. Yeah, absolutely I'm starting to so there's aconversation that I have on a regular basis and it's this idea of why someinnovations fail and why do some succeed so before I kind of go there w?What's your perspective on why some...

...succeeded whysome fail, you know it. I say every singlesituation is is different. I think that that likely mostentrepreneurs feel at least the stories that I hear as I talk to entrepreneursin the market is that is that most opportunities failed because they they don't end up with enough capital. You know, capital is this for most cmeos capital is the the the resource that constrains them mostdramatically and AL, ultimately, the thing that they run out of so I think, that's most most clear.It's most salient, although I don't actually think that money isthe issue, I think money ends up being a proxy for time. I think time is the scarcest resourcethat that startups have. I think it's not only the amount oftime that it takes to build something and prove that it can be successful, but it's also the amount of time thatyou spend building something to prove that it can't be successful. You knowit furs, not bast right, that's exactly right! You know, you know they. They don't teach you. If there was, you know, start up entrepreneur schoollike if such a school existed and it doesn't exist and there's no greatsigal book to you know that on the topic, my bet is that there would be abunch of talk about tenascity and continuing to push hard and pushthrough object. You know objections and keep trying and pipot and try again andthen Pivit and try again and- and so there's a lot of talk aboutthat, but it turns out that there's not nearly as much talk about how to failright and, in fact failing is way more important in someways than succeeding. I mean failing happens, you know people say it's.Ninety nine percent. I think that that number is way way too low. I think it'smore. Like ninety nine point, nine or ninety ine point nine nine percent ofthe time you know people fail and yet there's no learning about how to fail,and I so you know, I think, one of the most importantthings that that entrepreneurs can do is even in those first six, twelveeighteen, twenty four months, independent to whether or not they haveaccess to a lot of money like in some ways. Access to a lot of money can bethe worst thing that Ta de, because it enables them to take too much timeright. Yeah at really need to do is, and some investors were really good atputting these these midostones in place. And if you don't meet that six monthmilestone and you don't meet or you don't meet the twelve month mile stone.You know know that it's done right now way to find thosemilestones is incredibly impornt right that your Mol stowing around consumeradoption and you're in a consumer space, and you know that it takes a year ayear and a half to start getting consumer adoption. That's probably anunrealistic milestone to set sholl, I yep absolutely so I I think that that is just incrediblewisdom for audience to live to heed majority of our listeners or innovatorsthat are in the trenches today and- and there is a big fear of failure andright society does not embrace that enough, especially in the entreprenialmarket, and I come across people that get access to millions of dollars andthey pour it all into the product. They don't always do what you did, whichthey're not always including stakeholders in the product,development, the CO creation process and I've talked to someone not thatlong ago they were three years in like five million into the product and theyhadn't even gone toe market, yet they weret because it wasn't ready yet andit so somebody needed to take that money from them. Aaway take that away along time ago. It's true so there's there's another thing thatreally stands out to me that I think that you guys do extremely well andit's story telling so let's shift gears a little bit and talk aboutstorytelling and how?...

How do you feel? How do you think thatstorytelling fits into your commercializzation process and what wasyour purpose and intention behind building out such an incredible story? I think our storytelling is likely morerelated to the brand and the trust and our position in the market. Then Imean obviously tha. All of that is incredit is directly related and feedsinto commercialization, but it really started with the the need to make decisions around what we weregoing to stand for as as a product like like yeah, it's true we're deliveringprimary care and people get sick and they come to us and we dianose andtreat them. And yes, we can look at it at that level. But what we wanted to dois really stand back and and think about our role in this incredibly interesting, this complicated and and sort of rich with history ecosystem.You know, you know it's easy to stand and throw darts. You know a d. add thehealthcare ecosystem in the United States and I know, there's a lot ofpeople who like to spend most of their pasttime, throwing those tarts, but we wanted to take a position inthat ecosystem, which meant that we were going to be come part of that problem. You could say, and we wanted to define what our rolewould be within that ecosystem and ecosystem Tbut I happen to believe, isactually pretty incredible. I mean you on look at the work that Brad has done.You know in his time before he came to ninetypoint six. You know you look at the innovation, whether it's innovationthat happened on the battlefield or the innovation that that he was a part ofaround micro, fliitics or any of the other amazing innovations that arehappening. Some of them are happening at health systems and it you know an in laboratories. I meanit's an amazing ecosystem, yes, their problems, but our narrative. Our story was aboutbeginning to lay out how we wanted to take some degree ofresponsibility in this credible ecosystem and the impact that we wantedto have. That's that. That was really the purpose for the storytelling yeahyeah well, and I think sometimes health innovators really with struggle withtrying to figure out what's their clclear indistinct value propositionright. I hear from investors quite often of them being pitched byinnovators to raise that capital that you were talking about and- and I setthem set with these folks for forty five minutes or now R, and I stilldon't really know what they do and and- and I think it's even more complicatedwhen you're talking about a break through innovation, because it's radically different, noone's really set the ground work right. So what does ondemand primary care mean? You know and you'vegot to kind of, create a story to communicate that and what it means, andso I think that you guys have done a really good job, an a real good examplefor our listeners to kind of heed some of that storytelling that you've done it. It takes a lot of work. You knowwhen you see that single value proposition, you think that it's! Ohit's just one sentence you just you know, take a few minutes. Twentyminutes and just knock that out and it's it's no right right right, it's so you know when it came to themessaging. You know tiged to the storytelling. You know what Wase someof the things that you struggled with, because, again our audience is kind ofdoing this right now trying to figure out what their value proposition. So,how did you go through that process to end where you are today? Go ahead, thanks, yess, just on the onthe physician side, I think we've done a lot of work around understanding howto exist within NACO system, a there's tons of very passionate people inhealthcare who are trying to do the right thing, so many ofrestructures andplace for them to make the impact they would like. Our approach is to comeinto that space and find those advocates find how we can align andsupport their visions, look at as partners and solving problems,necessarily even as disruptors to the...

...existing eposystem and that allows usto sit alongside the existing primary car community. Instead of looking aslike a threat to the primartar community hand and Brad is raising the the element that was by far Andaway the most complicatedpart of building our narrative. It was thinking about all of ourconstituents. It turns out. We have a lot of constituence. We have some of these constituents well,actually al. All of them are people who we want to ultimately serve. You know,in fact, here at ninet point six. We tried to avoid using the wordcustomer because I never want us to be sittingaround the table and debating about who our customer is. It turns outtheyre all our customers right. The patients are our customers, theselfinsured employers are our customers. The health plans are absolutely our customers. We are hopeful that the health systemswith the physicians who ultimately carry those health systems day and theday out, are our customers. You know we're learning that there are otherelements of the ecosystem. The people- often don't even talk about you knowlike the pharmacy. You know like all of these people are,are Ar constituents who we believe that wecan serve. You know we didn't think about thephysicians who we were hiring as people who we serve, but that that wasactually that that was a mistake we should have now. It turns out. Ournarrative worked really well in that context, but the truth of thematter is our constituents include every single person who we hire. Itincludes every physician who we're trying to recruit so the hardest thingfor us was building a narrative that would becompelling to every single one of these constituents. That's really really hardin this industry. You know, and unfortunately, if you're,if you're, building a narrative that is compelling the chances are that it'sgoing to upset someone right that someone is going to beturned off by that narrative or think that you have hubris. You knowrepresenting the narrators in that voice, and so we were really carefuland ultimately had to come, come throughwith something that we not only believed in deeply. You know in oursoul, but also was a narrative that we felt would be embracing of all of these differentconstituous. Well, I think that's so right, becausea lot of people ask me, you know why is it so complex? Why is it so difficultto commercialize an innovation and healthcare compared to otherindustrrees and being a multisided market that you just describedabsolutely aids in that complexity and that difficulty, because, like you justdescribed tha the the user is not necessarily the by air right. It's notnecessarily the PRESCRIBER. I mean it's just it's. Healthcare is just such acomplicated ecosystem in buying process, and I find that sometimes stay colder groups or constituents canbe eliminated forgotten when we're going through that messaging process orthey can be just muddled, andtangled, N and or we're just we're, always likewe're really excited about the patients and how we're going to change theirlives and make their make this world a better place that we forget. You know alot of the value proposition to the VDB stakeholder. So that's just so so true,so you kind of touched on this a little bit so want to talk now about like whatare some of the things, the decisions and we touched on it. But what are someof the decisions that you think that the I didn't know it then? But when Imade this decision it, it was really really influential ind the success thatwe're experiencing today. So I'm GOIN TA SORT OF SET Brad up herea little bit because I'd like him to answer this question with a little bit fackdrop Yep, when when we hired Brad, it's fair to say that well, I certainlyhad no. I had no more than a year of experience with health care,...

...and I certainly personally you know and and a bunch of people whoI had you know on the executive team, even atthat point had no experience actually building a plenic, Andoyou, know and n. When Brad came onboard- and we were just incredibly fortunate to be introduced to him- and you know our conversations spendseveral months. You know before bread was ready to join us. You know I gave Brad and his peers all gave Bradan enormous amount of room to to build the clinic of the future. You know tobuild a clinical operation that likely physicians only dream about,and and but unfortunately, you know never really have a chance to dreamabout, and there were a lot of decisions. I L and Brad will talk toyou about a couple of them. The Brad made early on that Weren', anthey weren't part of they couldn't have been part of our plan at the beginning,because we had no business making a plan around those issues because we nohad no history yeah, but but what we knew was that we had to have incredibletalent at the table to help us make some these decisions so bred. Maybe youcan talk about some of those critical first decisions you made aroundbuilding the clinic that have ended up just being core to to how we operate for thanks, foraving,I think to Robbie's credit. You gave me a lotof space, Tho persfe Monts to really dive into one of our core values ofcritically informed thinking and unconstrained thinking around. What could we do to really build thisclinic of our dreams that he askd past as cu build? And there are a coupledimensions to that which were even new for me: I'd built clinics in the past,but obviously nothing on the scale, nothing that demanded this sort of tobuild it on demand. Primmacare service that cross tha boundaries ultimatelyprovided tenty, O seven care to adult in kids was a fairly heavy lift. When I looked at the market, I justfelt hat. The most important thing to fall back on was quality that if wecould build a quality physician service, a medical service that was consistentwith the brand that ultimaeleted that over time would really allow us to come into the marketand have heal systems and employers as well, really appreciate the work we'redoing and so that we had to start from the beginning. With that fundamentalapproach. So I went to Robbie, and I said after afew months of molling this over and saying you know, I think we need to plicense our physicians across thecountry. I haven't seen any company- that's donethat yet so, but we're Goingnao haveto be the first. It's going to cost a fairamount of money. Doctor ULLMY DO YEAH! You know, I knowI just got a couple months ago, but no, I need to look a lot of money to dothis and and but I think it ultimate give us wayI want, which is, instead of being a company Thatit's out n the market,saying we have five three: Four: four thousand doctors in the market, thatservice our clients that we have a smaller number of COR clinitions whodeliver the care every day and when you, when you come in in ninet point six,you know exactly the kind of care getting, because you can look on ourwebsite and see exactly who our physicians are Theyr Work for ninetypoint six, so we started that process and I had never worked in a companythat had a a core values that thit was so lived,believed ind discussed on a daily basis. I've never experienced that personallyand I think a lot of physicians help here. I've never seen that so to impartthat kind of culture on to de Physician, througr coming on was incrediblyexciting. Everyone was really on board with that and we started licensingthose clenitions across the country and we've continued with that strategy since the beginning to this day, andthat's still how ere approaching our physician hiring that you know as long as we continue to hireour physicians as fulltime and Yo, so a put them through the same rigoroustests that the other members of the company have so one ofthe things that's probably worth highlighting is I didn't want thephosicians to be looked at any differently here for the F T, the easyindto the heart, so they go to the same interview process. The sofper injerygoes through the same interview loop. They don't there's no shortbets and Ithink you know we only hire one out of every, maybe twenty applicants, but theones we hire are of the quality that can reallyrepresent the brand twenty four seven, three sixty five. Are you guys veryintentional about the the training and...

...development that goes along with themto be able to live out those values? You know without being under your roof? Yeah I mean the wore. We, the commissions, have their ownprivate communication channels to discuss the court values and how howthose are impact in the work they're doing they're discussed by everyone inthe company on a day they baseic they're called out in meetings in groupmeetings and one of ones on a dayto day basis, which is really excitid, uniqueAF. The physicians are engaged in that same type of behavior, so there we havereally spent a lot of time as we fired. Some conitions were not in Seattle forvariety of reasons that they really have to be as deeplyengaged in the companyes. Everyone else so they're in the office a lot becausewe want them anre wo in the same way and sort of he ultimate charge to theteam was that want to comnission in Florida to feel as deeply connected torobicave as the physician he lives in Seattle, and I think we've accomplishedthat okay at Gra- and you know it is- It isso deeply impactful weare and it's one of the reasons why we've been sosuccessful at repruiting, some of the best primary care physicians in thenation. Two. Ninety point: Six: You know thisthis point that that the brad made around every one of our employes beingone of our physician bhing, one hundred percent dedicated two ninety point, sixand being being being a permanent employe, the company that is part of it. The other part of it, is everything hetalked about around the way that we treat them at the company. You know alot of a lot of physicians. I hear this Im, I'm not a visitior and I've neverbeen a physician, but I hear from physicians we hire that theyre they'reused to working in this environment where theyre thereare almost lone wolfs,even even if they are part of a huge system, ' still like they're alone inthe room. Yes, they have a patient there, but the patient is the personthey're serving they operate very alone. The vast majority of the time, whereashere even when a patient is in that that chat with a single position that physician beals like they are partof a very large team, an and it's not just because of the software thatthey're using it's, because you know when, when theyget off that shift, they're probably going to be jumping into meetings withyou know five or six or seven people across the company talking about somefuture innovation that we're going to build into the product, that's going tomake a difference for our patients or for them in their physician experience,and that team dynamic is imcredibly powerful and it ends up accrutting allthese other values. You know just just as a matter of nature: it's really justit's really magic m. It sounds like Ike it, and you know to me it kind of goesback to looking at the physicians as a separate audience segment,understanding the problems and needs that they have and then being able todeliver a strong value proposition to them. Just like you would payincustomers, that's right, yeah, that's about Ed,just just like we do! For the software engineers who you know who we're out there trying torecruit and just like we do for the marketers or the communications peopleI mean you know we have to build as as a company as a growing company, that'sout there competing for talent in an aggressive marketplace. We we thinkvery carefully about the value that we're delivering every single personwho has a role to play on this team and the physicians. A E are no differentand it sounds like you had that mindset early, on which you know in theconversations that I have with a lot of health innovators. They think aboutvision, mission, values, culture. You know, employee engagement down the roadright now, it's about raising money and building the technology, and I thinkthat some of the some of them kind of miss out on the benefits of putting allof those other things in place earlier on in that process. Yeah, THAT'S ABTUALLY! True! I I happen.You know personally, I'm incredibly fortunate that and that you know we have. I have acofounder who is able to spend...

...the majority of his time focused on thefundraising which has allowed me. You know in my position as the CO, with the executives on the team, an tofocus almost all of our time on building the company now t the otherthing that was important to us from the very early days and again, I'd say thatthis was related to advice, that we got not onlyfrom my co founder, but also from the otherpeople who we were seeking advice Brom, who are some of the most phenomenalbusiness leaders in the world. We decided early on that we had tobuild the company for scale from day one we knew, or actually wecouldn't have known. We imagine that the value proposition that we werecreating was going to be incredibly compelling, and then people were goingto want to adopt it quickly and then we wanted to be in a position to deliver.So we were going to have to grow the company quickly. In order to do so, we we needed tobuild a very solid foundation. You know it's like you know. You're building askysprapbird and you want to be digging. You know your foundation deep, deep inthe ground, because it's got to carry this incredible. Building that you'regoing to build up on top of it, and so we literally thought from day one aboutbuilding the infrastructure that would support a business that we imaginedcould be imredibly impactful in the industry. So things like the core values that we set. We setthose very very early, the muscles that we set. We set them very, very early,the key executives who we hire. You know we brought those people on very,very early all to support the growth that we were hoping. What would happenwe couldn't know, but we knew that if we executed it would happen yeah. So so I think that you've, you know, aswe've had this conversation to today. You've shared a lot of your personalexperience and that that's been really invvaluable for the listeners. The lastquestion I have for you is there anything else, any other advice thatyou would want to give to those other health innovators that are out there inthe trenches right now. It's FOM my perspective. I would just keep keep motivated on on a task thatyou believe can actually can healthcare and keep driving forward to that anddon't be lulled by the traditional sales cycles that hospitals may have,because there's other many other opportunities to drive your idea, YourBusiness, your company forward, more than an an annual sales cycle,andwe'll, have to have a whole nother episode to talk about that. Sobry. What do you have to say? Youknow it's! It's almost! It's almost the same point the brad made and maybe justsaid slightly differently, so it it's it's about failfast, but even at themicro level, which means you need to take what your building or when you'rethinking you want to build out there as quickly as possible. Certainly itshouldn't take you more than a month or two months to go out thereand begin gathering feedback from the market that you're ultimately going towant to sell to, on whatever it is that you're planning on building you know ifit's consumer business, you should be able to stand it up in a month or amonth and a half absolutely you should it might not be everything that youwanted to be, but you need to start that cycle of failing and relentlessimprovement and failing and relentless improvement. I mean that, is you knowit's all about failure. You know, you said no one wants to fail. If you don'twant to fail, you shouldn't start a company. It's all right right. You've heard it right here, Oaiyou gotta fail, you got to learn, you got to change, you got to grow and the sooneryou can get that cycle going to better. If, if it is a a an enterprise salethat you need to do and you're thinking- oh my God, it's going to take me a yearand a half from two years to build up a product that I can actually sell to theenterprise. I don't agree, build a prototype even if it's, even ifyou build it with a sharpy and a piece...

...of copypick Ier yep, build a prototypeand then go sit down in front of the people who you'll ultimately sell thatproduct to and get their feedback. Let them tell you that your baby is ugly and actually want to hear it, becausethat's what's going to get you to go back and relentlessly improve, that'swhat it's all about yeah. Sometimes I think that innovators are afraid to askthose constituents what they think, because they might not think like theythink and they really want to build what they want to build and they almostdon't care what the audience wants. I know what you need. Let me give it toyou. Well, we we, we all know how that story endsright right, right, yeah, those are the ones just maybe thataren't failing fast they're, taking a whole lot of time and people and moneydown with them in that failing process. That's right it, but I mean I'll.Ultimately, ultimately, those people y like yes,there might be one in a million of them, and everyone likes to focus on the onein a million then ended up just building what they wanted and didn'task anyone and they ended up succeeding. It's very easy to focus on that one ina million yeah. What one in a million doesn't happen right right, that's nothow the vast majority of successis occur. You know success is happeninghappend by building what the customer wants and the only way you know whatthe customer wants is by sitting in front of them and asking them absolutely well. I think that that wasa great way to end this episode. I have thoroughly enjoyed this conversation. Ihope everybody that's listening is taking notes because there's just awealth of wisdom, that's peppered in throughout this series, and so I'm justgoing to ask you an our closing question. How can people get a hold ofyou if they want to find out more about ninety eight point six and what you'redoing what's the best way for people to REAC you so there's there's two things that I'dlove for for every listener: to do. First of all, go to the APPSTORE and download ninety point six and trythe product and send US bee back. I mean it's twenty dollas for the firstyear for unlimited access to primary care. So even on your first visit, thethe APP will have paid for itself and you can use it another ten times youknow forg the maind of the irernetd. It's not going to cost you a singlepenny, but most of all send us be back. So that's the first thing that we'dlove for you to do, and the second thing you know, if you you know, if you directly or indirectly know of people who lead benefits,organizations and who are delivering benefits to their employees, pleasehave them, go to ninety point. Sixcom and learn about our offering foremployers, learn about our offering for health plans and then send us a contactus note, because we'd love to talk to you about how we can bring the value ofnine et point six to those people who depend on you. Well, that's awesome, I'm a raving fanand I will help you promote this company as best as I possib like can:okay, okay, what's the difference between launchingand commercializing a health care, novation many people will watch a newproduct. Few will commercialize it to learn the difference between watchand commercialization and to watch past episodes of the show head to our videoshow page at Dr Roxycom thanks so much for watching and listening to the showyou can subscribe to the latest episodes on your favorite podcast APPlike apple podcasts and spotify, or subscribe to the video episodes on ourYoutube Channel, no matter the platform just search Coyq with Dr Roxy untilnext time. LET'S RAISE OUR COIQ.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (107)