Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode · 1 year ago

Obvious But Often Overlooked Strategies that Impact Market Success w/Julie Mann

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Successful healthcare organizations build a successful structure and culture early on, and lay the right foundation from the onset. This is something many upcoming innovators can learn and implement early in their operations.

How do we come up with compelling and powerful foundational messaging? What are the most pivotal decisions our guest’s team made that are paying off significantly now? How do we uphold the strength of our value proposition?

On this episode, Chief Commercial Officer at Holon Solutions, Julie Mann, shares what has contributed to their success and the key lessons they’ve learned along the way. 



Guest Bio- 

Julie Mann is the Chief Commercial Officer at Holon Solutions. She leads commercial operations for Holon Solutions. Holon empowers their value-based care clients with patented, first-to-market, sensor-based solutions to surface contextual insights into the workflow. 

 

Holon liberates the data to liberate the care. Julie is passionate about solving the challenges in healthcare through innovation, collaboration, and partnership. For more information, visit https://www.holonsolutions.com/ or connect with Julia on LinkedIn.  

Welcome to Coiq, where you learn howhealth innovators maximize their success, you're working on somethingbig, something like saving something world changing. Yet ninety five percentof health, inedation failed and real lives are on the line. That's whylaunching is not enough. Commercialization is the most criticalyet overlooked stage of the innovation process through candid conversationswith health, innovators, early adoptors and influencers you'll learn the fivecomponents of the COIQ early adoption strategy. So if you want to changelives and dominate your market, why not give your innovation the best chance tosucceed? I'm your host Docor Roxy founder of legacy DNA, an internationaldeath selling author of how health innovators maximize market success andnow, let's join the conversation and maximize your success. Welcome back to the show coiq listenerson today's episode. We are going to explore what it takes to successfullycommercialize in innovation and health care, and I have from someone who isdoing it really well- and I have someone with me here today: Julie Man,welcome to the show. Thank you, Dr Oxy. So Julie is the chief commercialofficer for Holan Solutions, and I thought you would be able to. You knowstart off the conversation by telling us a little bit about your backgroundand what you do sure sure. Well, thanks again forhaving me, so I would say to start off. I am a customer first person totallyand currently in my role, I nead commercialoperations for Hoon, which is all the customer facing things. So I wouldclassify myself as being the person in charge of making the magic happen. Youknow making sure that I'm connecting people that have problems to oursolutions that solve them, so I haven't always been in sales. I kind of startedmy career off in a medical billing company, where I USD to pose chargesand payments. Lly Sort is a really good foundationfor kind of where I'm at today, Aheh so slowly. I evolved into different roles.I then started kind of trading customers on how to use romrecyclemanagement software. The sales team, then, would tap me to kind of help themwith sales, presentations and demonstrations and then, from there Ikind of got introduced to a full sales role, and I would say, the COMEC themein my career has always been at customer focus, but then also always towork with the most innovatev technologies that are on the market.You know, I am by nature, surious and ther has tons of problems and there's alot technologies out there right that...

...just add to those problems, so I factedto companies that have these kind of break through solutions, and so that'sreally what ended me at whole one today. So so thank you for sharing that. It'samazing how all of those lily pads really early on in our career, really influence and build into whatwe're doing today, when we would have never thought that when we were in thatmoment so so you know you kind of touched onthis a little bit describe from your perspective. What it's like! Writingthis crazy roller coaster of health care novation. Today, it's really refusing you know. I wouldsay that for anybody, that's in healthcare, that's attended, Wen. Thebig conferenceis like Hims, for example. Right, if you are walking through thetrade, show floors right right, right and itting gitantic.It is etic right and when you just kind of stop and have a casual conversationright of being like. So what do you do? It's very seldom that you hear somebodyarticulate something in the simplest form that you can understand and belike a good bob right in most cases, especially in those scenarios wherehins you know, has a wide variety of different health care technologysolutions, not like a Nich, you know audience it's really interesting right. It's likeand, you're still like okay.What do you do, though? For me I've always just really beenfocused on that is like. How can you take something? That's supercomplicated that you know is really innovative but be able to commercializeit in a way that people are instantly going to get it. You know it's notgoing to be this really ten paragraph explanation. You know it's like acouple sentences like that's what we do and then you can. He die on ee yeah. Sowhat are thise couple of sentences for you guys for us? It's hol on liberatesthe data to liberate the care. I am Tart. We lost that two minutes s Likwe do what's really complicated inthe back end right. We have a new way of making data actionable and we can gointo that. But fundamentally that's what we do. We liberate the data toliberate the care, and it was a statement that my colleague, RobertConley kind of just throw out there. You know we're preating for a bigmeeting when, with our prospect at the time, Philips Yeah welimerate the data.I was like yes, this, as at the time when one of thescarwar movies is coming out. RIGHTA rebellion e now right, tlosly, like hadput it out there as we ere putting our presentation together with Phillips,and when we said we liberate the data...

...it just really resignated with them,because the current state that we're in Min healthcare right is Davas silot.It's all over. The people have made tremendous investments in differentkinds of technologies, whether it be their HR, their Hie, their pop healthplatforms, yeah fundamental problem that they have is they can't make thatdata actionable, because it's a Lotd in these silos. You know the best solutionthat people have come up with is like a portal or something like that:but'right not out there Yoa, so the world liberate people get it. You know,as am as we say, liberate the data they're like we need that Eli with apurpose right. The reason I ik reading me is: We want to let positions bepysicians. You know we want nurses to be nurses. We want the care team tofeel like they have the right information about the patients thatthey're seeing, and so we beent really rewarding to kind of come to that. Youknow it was kind of corky how it started, but it really speaks tofundamentally what we do. You know in my experience, the most powerfulcompelling Tha Messaging Strategy that we've ever developed for our cliets hasalways been developed in the most strangest ways. You know I have a colleague and as soonas she says, okay, this is going to sound, really dumb, but and I'm likeokay, you know the magic is coming Youdoyeah. So it's just you know youstumble upon these things and it's like Aha and what I really love about. Theyou know. This phrase that you just communicated is obviously itssimplicity, but, as you think about earlier doctors, you know justcharacteristicly of early adopters, their kind of rebels right they'rewalking for like the new, the different. What everybody else is it doing, and sojust that word that verb liberate like what early a doptor doesn't want to getbehind that movement yeah. So I it's attracting that early segment of themarket in a real, powerful way. You know it really has, and it's allowed usto really kind of cut through. You know that noise that is t at is Hans. Thatis the healthcare it space in general, and I think that we're also reallyfocused right, like we're not trying to save the world and do everything right,like the whole reason that we started the company was, you know we just sawthis data problem right like it used to be like a paper problem. You know Nowasa data problem and you can't just give people a firehose of one yitunial dataand think that that's going to be actionable and they're Inna reay rightall that text and be like. Oh, I just needed to know about who their PCP wasright, so that whole thought of being like, let's just be really meaningfulof being focused on solving this very specific problem of being able toservice the right information at the...

...right time. So that's another thing that I think isreally fascinating about this whole commercialization process as you'retalking about solving a single problem. So a lot of times when we're workingwith health, innovators, they might go into it with the intentto solve one problem, but it's like, but we could also solve this and wecoan solve this, and we could solve this for this market and this for thissubmarket, and so I find that that convolutes, the messaging thatconvolutes the value proposition and it sounds like that's- also something thatyou've done. That's really been a game changer for you guys is really focusingon a single business problem. It really is because the end of the day it's likewe are so focused on getting the bright information to the care team h right.So it leads to other things right, so we did gothrough an exercise really early on when I joined and coming up with ourcommercial plan. Right say who is our ideal customer profile and not thatthat's like a unique strategy, but it's really really important right and sounderstanding like okay. This is kind of what we can do. Who are the people that you know havethis problem? You know you could say all of health care rightlike you could say that we narrowed it down to primary markets and we wereultrafocus on those primary markets and those primary markets for us are health systems and vendors, and witheach of them they have the same users right. It's the bright, Ol Care, thecare teams, and so our messaging is slightly different right, but we knowwe have this focus and we went through this exercise. The first time we did,it was really painful right, e ystrong personalities. That's what makes us agreat team right, yeah, Yeph respectives, and you want to workthrough it. We do yeah s. You know we agreed rightlike this. Is Our foundational kind of game plan like thisiness who ourcustomer is. This is who it's not. This is who we are, and this is who we're noand iy of us are marching orders so that, as we got into theseconversations, because it's pretty common, you know hen, we're kind ofshowing people like what we can do, but they be like. Oh, can you help me withHisyo know and in the past right it would havebeen so easy we didn't have. Those carbrills would be like sure. Why notlet's try it and it would o wemeet cash flow. It was a cach flow. So let's doit yes, and so it's also kind of given usthat discipline, you know to say, listen. We agreed on this now thereevery once in a while right, therewill be kind of that Anomila that POPs upbut we'll talk about it and be like okay, like what are the rules that willhave for this engagement. You know, let's put some book ens if you willyeah and because you don't want to shut down something really good, but it'sallowed us to have that foundation that we then built upon, and so we knewexactly who were targeting ou kN w. We...

...knew exactly what problems we weresolving for them and it just made such a better interaction with thosecustomers. So you know it seems as though thatthat is kind of like a now brainer going through the exercise of thattargeting strategy and really developing that ideal customer profileand, like you said not only what you are or who is your ideal customer, butalso who is who is not your ideal CCUSTOMER, but so many people overlookthat strategy and what I see happen really oftenspecially for early stage. Healthcare tech companies is that if they don't dothat work when they're in the pilot phase, theyget really excited about it and they've got this new business and typicallythose early adopter customers are visionaries theyre. They see the future,that's what motivated them to buy into something that was really brand new andwhen they do that they have all these ideas of what they could do with yoursolution. And so how do you determine which one of those are going to begreat ideas and they're commercially viuable for all of your customers andwhich ones are just the customization that that particular customer iswanting? That could derail you and take you off course? Oh, I asn't that a good topic Weli can tell you we're going throughthat with one of our largest esio customers right, they're, fantastic,and one of the reasons that they're so fantastic is because we're a perfectfit right, like we had a piece of technology that they really need to gesthe problem, and so when you fun ten play have that right, we didn't forceanything you know and Tiy foranatthing. It just was going to work. Christ likeright, iy, Col, let's so we're starting from that standpoint. The other thingthat really works is transparency and just talking to them right. So, nodoubt they would kind of throw some things at us and we tried a couple andsome just did not work right, yeah and were like hey. You know we tried it. Wewent into it with you as a sparit apartnership, but this is where we needto stay focused yeah yeah, so we just had another conversation. I don't know I want to say like threemonths ago and they told us about this ee, big, strategic priorrity and wedidn't have known about it and we're like well cool et's help you with thatwe're like we can just our product. Does that right, Lik! You can hop. Yousaw that and they're like. Oh, you know, so myonly was it such a an hi moment for us like with them. We immediately Dhedn 'tstart, you know developing everything and you know want to commercializeanother application. Yep Ye tapped several industry experts. You know,consultants, analyst, obviously lots of other provider, organizationns, Bundersand just said Hey. We got a heard about this. You know. Would this bemeaningful to you and Dr axe consistently people ere like if you cansolve for that, and so when you get...

...that overwhelming reaction, your nyoure onto something really good yeah. I can we, you know kind of quickly andagain, since Wor Liy, Young Nimble Company, we can come Haron Stufftogether pretty quickly and I mountement about this new applicationon our platform, and not only do we just make the new announcement. We alsofound a couple of customers to do it, but waitcosy right that that innovator,early adoptor when they're, like we've, been trying to solve this to you got or you know- and I think that those arethe kinds of markers if you will right that, whenyou kind of are consistently hearing that you don't just listen to oneperson, you know start to, you know, throw it out there with a diet, diversepool and you're getting that consistent feedback. It's so exciting! Hey! It's Dr Roxy! Here with a quickbreak from the conversation. Do you want your innovation to succeed tochange lives to shape the future of health care? I want that for everyhealth innovator, which is why I invented coy Q, an evidence basedframework to take your innovation from an idea to start up to the full marketadoption, if you're, not sure where you are in the commercialization process,take the free assessment. Now at Dr Roxycom Backfour, don't miss out onimpacting more lives just because you have a low coiq score. The freeassessment is t at Dr Roxycom back four, that's Dr Roxiecom backslash sc ore,and now, let's jump back into the conversation, so it's almost like a for an informalversion of CO creation with the customers and soalways advocating for Co creation. You know it's fascinating to me how manyentrepreneurs or companies that want to only innovate do all of that productdevelopment with their internal team and don't tap into the external stateholders that can really reduce the rnd cost and and kind of make sure thatyou're going to go to market with something that's actually going tosolve one of their top priority problems right. I know it's funny, even when you say it.It's like it sounds so obvious, Righthi like when you get around technologists,especially right, like yeah, so in love wit what they can build. You know yeshhour of it and it's like no, no right, Haro design to solve aproblem, and you have to engage those people that you're solving the problemfor and during that process. For us right likewe went, we got super excited and it was almost like. It's like, okay, let'srain back in right, like it's Focusiin...

...and let's talk to people and not justtalk to like you know the top executives, oeur right, yeah, engagingthroughout their organization and multiple stateholders to again not justtalking yea, and I can tell you it's so rewarding right like when you actuallycall people up right and I have a lot of favorite clients. You know my teamcheased me all the time because they're, like you, sayd about everybody, the Best Ompin Aus. If I wul question,I can just call them and if it doesn't matter in thatit's like the chiefmedical officer or you know, one of the nurses who's an administrator, you knowyeah, they Alli want to talk to us becausethey know that we care you know, and that's so I mean that's, that's that'sunheard of or not unheard of, but it's rare. Usually it's like I'm busy thearcheotic over here. Don't call me unless there's a hire, no lat and it's so awesome because it'slike it's just making it transparent right to be like hit. We were talkingso and so, and they thought about this just be mainful to you, because youbout how a lot of decisions are made in health care right like let's just saythe C sweet decides that they have this problem and they're, like you know,were just going to throw this piece of technology at it. It's going to besalted, yeah man, users get it and a're like we're. Not using that rigt lateris like a bus giantial for us to kind of Gase forout organizations and betalking to everybody and make sure that everybody's aligned and then design youknow they apt to meet their warflows and make their work clothes better,yeah, Wel, powerful, because then people use it. You know clinish anengagement goes up, you know, ry goes up and like everybody's happy and yeah,and that's why I feel like I can say those things like. I love all ourcustomers, so you kind of mentioned this a littlebit but take us back to like the early daysright the beginnings of colon solutions. You know what what do you think? Whatwere some of those decisions that you or the organization? You know the otherleaders made that you think were just like pivotal decisions for you like ifyou hadn't made that, like you didn't, maybe realize it then that it was goingto be so impactful. But, looking back in hindsight wow, this was a gamechanger for us this was, you know, helped put it set on a path of success.Yeah, I would say that hands down for us. It was picking the best earlycustomers, not only the people who ere like theinnovators right, but the people that truly wanted to go into a relationshipwith us as partners. Understanding that we haven't had everything figured out.You know we got like t really smart people that created some like newsolutions, Ol problems, but there was...

...still going to be some figuring out,and you know your the term like development partners, yeah reallycategorize them, as that I really cagorize them as Berly customers, andso we had some absolutely fantastic ones and ones that would work with usand have those conversations right. Then imen that I was talking to you notlooking to us to be like they have all the answers. You know they knew that.Okay, here is what we think. What do you think? Let's try it out and let'sthen talk about it like what worked? What did it work and I think, havingthose relationships was just absolutely key and at the same time we walked awayfrom a few relationships right that on paper it was kind of hard. I go rd ens right going back to that wholeCaslo conversation like that's, not going to help us right like. I don'tthink that that's going to be something that's going to be a long term win. Itis goring to help a short term problem right yeah. I really think that,fundamentally choosing the best customers was one of the best decisionswe've made. So you know kind of take us back to that that moment or that stageyou know, was anyone on the team ever concerned about turning down businessor saying that this was an ideal customer, and this one wasn't and youknow, was there any type of you know, negotiation internally on who thoseearly customers were going to be. Like you know, what's I mean I idimaginethat it's not like everybody's, always on the same page of like this, is whatwe're going to do. Some people are, you know, typically of like you know. Howcan we say no to this I mean you nailed it. I mean, I think,T that's why I love about our team right. It's like sotill them is the anydecision that is made that everybody's, like yeah good idea right right, so it is having those differentperspectives and questioning like everything. You know- and I appreciatethat so much and I think that's part of the reason that we've been sosuccessful is because we have that culture right or everybody feels goodto be able to kind of jump in and have an opposing view and challenge things,because we're all in this together right and e. There were some hardconversations, and I think, kind of going back to those initial that idealcustomer profile session that we did was like remember, Yhat, right Y, a we called the Snyes and I becaseiwhen you start talking about like somebig names and healthcare. You knowit's like people just want to have that as acustomer and it's like yeah, but you guys that O l, it's not a good deal forus right. Oh my goodness, it's like you're preaching to the choir here,Ital W oo, because o now ABC umtopout system said Yes, your could actually beyour demise. Yes, is company down? Yes,...

O the racracy, the time, the change ofpriorities you know and a lot of times, especially for startup or emergentcompanies. I'm a I'm often recommending that they're. Looking for the you know,C C, level of C cients right, not even the secondary ones, but see level,because they're going to I found that they're going to be the ones that aremore open to that partnership, relationshipthat you described earlier, where they're not expecting you to have allthe answers and they're really wanting to participate in the development ofthat solution. Yes, Yep and I can totally see that- and I think that youknow when we look back at these things. That's everything right. Those earlyrelationships and growing them into even biggerengagements is really really exciting and we certainly experienced that withour you know, vendor partners, because it's rear to them right, likethey're in a competitive space, they have users that want their stuff to beeasier to interact with and so holl on can be their silent partner. So itmakes sense right, thet, we're gancingly at the table with them andtalking with them and there's some really cool things that are going tocome out. Butyeah, THAT'S AWESOME! So you know there's a lot of conversationright now about not necessarily going to market with products and solutionsas much as it is with going to market and creating a category te market catchop and that being areally a rual strong strategy for success andthat, if you're, just looking to just build awareness, an adoption of yourinnovation you're only going to increase you know so far. But if you'reactually trying to help create a whole category that you know so much sphotleadership and authority with that that it kind of snowballs its effectiveness,any you know experience or thoughts around creating a category versusmarketing a specific solution. It's so interesting that you say that,because when we were really kind of coming up with our foundationalmessaging a couple years ago, it was hard for people, because we area new solution right. We don't fit into anyone categorynicely right right, because we are surfacing insights into the workflow,we're not an interface bender, wer books, we're not in the HR and at firstpeople just want to Buckat you into one of these categories, and so we wentthrogh. This discussion of like okay, maybe we're this new category and thenwe're like. Let's not do that. Let's just focus on the problem that we'resolving right, ASA AR and kind of fast forward. You know to just even a coupleweeks ago I was talking to I had a...

...series of Talkingnos several analystsand I talked to Forester Gartner and Frostis Ullivan yeah every single oneof those conversations, Dr Roxy. They were like you guys, don't Gittin it anYo on category a we love this right, we l stuff doesn't. I was like Ohcool,because we think that too I stopp stressing out about it. You knowjeikedoes not apply. I can't tell you how many forms we would fill out wheretheislike d not appy right, because we don't but we're ogoing to put right right. That's so funny, so you know that in myexperience it's one of the pit falls because you know it's. It's a naturaland a lot of ways for us to want to fit in one of those boxes. But then therebecomes this disconnect of. How are we going out to the marketplace and sayingwe're unique and different rig you wantned to attract these revolutionaryearly adopters, but but we're like this yes like. Well, now you just basicallyyou know ruined everything else. You were saying because now, Tas Thudn, I'mputting you in the old box and you're, not exciting a new and differentanymore yeah yeah, and I love that you say that,because again, that was another one of those kind of decisions right whereyeah s like a lot of stress- and I be like- maybe I thinking about thiswrongwe're- like you- know what no e're just going to leave with this rightwe'N, I goin to spend all this time, creating this category or whateverright right right focus on what the clients need to be successful. An I'mso happy that you said that so so what number employee were you?Because I think you were you one of the earlie or you were there. You know insome of the beginning stages, right, yeah, so whole lot t the solution thatwe have today. We just commercially launched it in January of twenty eighteen, and I say that I'm like Oh,my Gosh I was like in so many plays. It seems like yesterday and then it seemslike many years in the right right right and so with that yeah it was apart of the team Li. I S brought in into commercialize. You know thesolution which is awesome and exciting, and so very early on. We are in grilt mode right now and we aregoing to be. You know, standing our team, which is reallyreally exciting, and so I think it's been really rewarding to be an earlymember of the team and kind of go through kind of that stage and justknow that there's so many other great things Ahout of us well, one of thethings that I wanted to point out is that you're, the chief commercialofficer- and that is a title that I often find in much larger, matureorganizations. So I think that I you know, as someone being on the outside.Looking in, I wsay that that's probably...

...one of the most important decisionsthat the CEO or th leader, whoever hired you made, was bringing someone ofyour caliber to kind of fulfill that role that early. I don't see thathappen very often they're thinking like oh well, when we get to this. That's whbring someone at that level in, but at that point all of thosecommercialization decisions are mostly already made and and so bringing you inearly, I assume had a big impact on thebusiness. I think so you know- and I think likewhen I it was very clear to the team. You know they told me that they knewexactly kind of what they were getting with me right, so they were reallyfocused on kind of picking me because they felt like I could kind of helpthem out yeah. I had that walking into it. You know,so I knew that I had the confidence of the whole team and everybody was goingto be very open, collaborative and honest with me, and I can also tell youthat when I first started they kind of thought. I would just be over sales andhelping kind of commercialize from that perspective, very quickly it. No this all this value.We can't pass up g and it's almost like when your early stage of that right too me I wouldn 't, be able been able to doit. If I was super silode, I need Ay Topole to interact with all the client facingcomponents of the business right because you know going to clients andlistening to them, and then you know talking to prospects. I have problemsand then talking to our implementation team- or you know, all of those thingswere allow me to kind of lead our strategy as a member of the team, but it's been very rewarding and I'mhone back here. So how do you you know? How do you think that the early structure of the Organization andCulture of the organization is playing a role in your success? I think that it is critical to oursuccess. You know, I think that the Culturat poll on truly is I it's a teameffort. You know, no one thinks that it's. You know one person drivingeverything and I feel kind of having that culture of we're all in thistogether and also this openness right of everything's, not always rainboos anuticorns, onoit, O kind of constantly be briaing feedback back and talkthrough those things, and I think that culture is so special and we've tried to also kindof put that out there, because a lot of companies don't Hant to hand that- andyou know it's awesome, lith all the tools available today. Right like we'rehuge on twitter, you know we love linke in we do blogs and we try to postpictures of different names. You know...

...like outside of just the professionalstuff that Oon's doing you know some fun yeah yeah and it's so cool, becauseI'm always talking to Aur prospect and I wrote a blog about the revolutionarywar and I use the termliberate. You know and she was like. I was readingthat and I was wondering how you're tied that back toliberating data shewoes Ba, you loved it and it's just sat the stage for such a nice conversationright because she felt like sharting O me. A little bit- and she already knew,like you know the Bibhat hold on and what we're trying to do and she's likeis'. This is where we're at, and it was like we're already on the parkershipdiscussion sho over that getting to know each otherthing a little bit more, and so I think as we grow, you know, we've been veryintentional to try to keep that. You Know Spirit out there so that peoplecan kind of see hey. This is what Hoon's all about. There's no surprises,and I think that's really important yeah. That's awesome, I'm so happy foryou guys, so you AU, so you just kind of touchedon something else. That I think is really interesting. Is the power andthe equalizer of social media. So you know the had idea is not necessarilynew right. Social media has been around for a long time, but I think especiallyin health care and for a startup. You know again that whole social mediathing is kind of like okay. When we get to a certain size, then we'll hiresomeone to kind of manage our social media. So it's kind of like aafterthought or like a longer term strategy and there's such a hugeopportunity. That's missed if we overlook that or wait for that forlater, for the all the reasons that you're just talking about you know whenyou're talking about boots on the ground and trying to connect withpeople right with phone calls or emails or knocking on Yoors it canespeciallywith the cold prospect. I mean Oh, my gosh, it can take forever Yeah D, Butthen you can have that that encounter th, but unsolicited encounter ondigital and just open the door wide open, yeah- and you know what I feellike so many healthcare companies aren't doing it. You know I've been afan of it forever. I had a friend gave he's amazing. He set me up on this,like maybe five years ago, Kidyou Na Hu. He call me the other day was like Ilove what you're doing I'. Always following you on twitter- and I said Iknow it's so powerful and that's what I love about it is you I, the topics thatare important to you and you can carryutthrough the noise Yeh so forhold on that's been a big deal. You know we do hashtand liberate the dataand its o. You get all our stuff and right right. It's like you, know it'sfun to put it out there, but we've mad some really, really great connections.You know I got it introduced to this woman by the name, Jena Sharp and shedoes the sharp index which is dedicated to reducing physician burnout, a great ally for whole on Rightit. Itbrought us together and we've done really cool things and we have a coupleother things planned, but we've met so...

...many people like that through the useof social media, and it's almost like a modern day like newsletter RII, youknow back in the day you would mail out. You know like a slick to somebody andwhatever Yo those o have in the garbage. Can You KNO WI twin? We don't have toaner email address rfonancial, and you can also like it'sjust really cool and it's a way to engage onr people and in the market and just stay current and what's going onMM. So what what recommendations are advice?Do you have for those listeners, those health, innovators right now that arein the trenches that are really struggling for for one reason or another? You knowwhat recommendations do you have for them? I would best summon up probably by alot of the topics. You know that we touched on I' way. You've got Ta Startand you have to be focused right, so you got to have a problem that Youresolving if you're not solving a meaningful problem like forget about it,just stop it right. So assuming you have a reallygreat problem and or is o day, you have a tough problem. You have really greatsolution to that problem. Yeah Watgo O that buyour identifying who your idealcustomer is right, and then you have to stay discipline with focusing on thatand I think once you kind of have those things, the rest will kind of fall intoplace. You know and having those early customers right that are going to lookat you as a true partner and you're in it together and you're getting feedbackand support from them. I think that those things combined are really whatstruggling organizations should look at first awesome. Well, thank you. So muchfor sharing your wisdom today with all of our listeners and with me. Iappreciate it Singrea, so much is been so fun. Absolutely all right! Welluntil next time, okay by five. Thank you so much for listening. I knowyou're busy working to bring your life changing innovation to market, and Ivalue your time and your attention to save kind and get the latest episodeson your mobile device automatically subscribe to the show on your favoritepodcast APP like apple podcast, spotify and stitcher. Thank you for listening,and I appreciate everyone. Who's been sharing the show with friends andcolleagues, see you on the next episode of coiq.

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