Health Innovators
Health Innovators

Episode 81 · 5 months ago

How proper positioning increases your chances of success w/ George Makhoul

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

When it comes to strategies, there are many different types you can utilize when commercializing an innovation.

But what happens when the market throws a curveball you, nor your investors, were expecting?

George Makhoul, CEO and CCO of Biom’up says that with a bit of grit, drive, and belief you can creatively - and successfully - commercialize a product, even during a pandemic.

Whether driving adoption or securing a champion, George explains how, when it all comes down to it, investors simply invest - it’s up to the innovator to work on the commercialization.

Join us on this journey with George as he delivers some tricks and tips his organization has used to continue working toward a successful commercialization in an unpredictable market.

Here are the show highlights:

Three characteristics you need to drive a successful commercialization strategy (2:01)

How you can successfully leverage unexpected setbacks (5:14)

How a hybrid approach to relationship building works in a digital environment (10:30)

Why it’s up to you, not investors, to commercialize for what you want (13:53)

Not being able to drive adoption could be the best problem to have! (21:24)

From concept to commercialization: know your audience (27:19)

Guest Bio

George Makhoul is CEO and CCO of Biom’up, a specialist in collagen-based absorbable medical devices who is committed to making life easier for surgeons and better for patients.

George has taken an over 20 year career in healthcare fields and parlayed it into driving revenue in the Medical Devices, Biologics, and pharmaceutical industries.

His diverse experience in everything from sales leadership to launch execution has been applied to developing new markets and maximizing the success of mature brands.

George earned his BA in Management, Business, Economics, Chemistry, Biosciences and Biology from Monrovia University.   

If you’d like to get in touch with George after the show, feel free to reach out to him via LinkedIn at George Makhoul. 

You're listening to health, innovators,a podcast and video show about the leaders influencers and early adoptorswho are shaping the future of health care on your host. DTR Roxy Movie Welcome Back Health Innovators. Ontoday's episode I Have George McColl with me. He is the US CEO for biomup,welcome to the show George they thank so much for having e uspreak te beertoday. Thank you so much so, if you could, just for our listeners, tellthem a little bit about your background and what you've been innovating thesedays. Okay, so being my name is George McCool and I've been in the HealthcamIndustry for over twenty years, so I've been fortunate enough to have a lot ofdifferent roles and sales, sales, marketing marketing leadership, businesShet enterprise leadership and in the last almost three years I've been ableto be theseain. You OFA, smaller start up, which is got a distruptivetechnology in the HUMO STACIS WORLD, and I've been lucky enough to work forsome great companies over the years like fizer and Genzam and striker,which have led me to where I am today and Wev. We've really sumbled upon avery unique hemostatic agent call. He Mo ast dellos and hit was approved bythe FDA right before two thousand and eighteen and we commercially launchedit in two thousand and nineteen. So we've had a great, a great conjectoryin the time that we've launched this and we are going inta market wherethere's two very, very large compettors who have had a good stronghold in thisMary of the market and we've been fortunate to have something: That'shighly efficg as highly differentiated and something that servid Os pend ogravitate o more once they starte using it. So not going too much more ofdetail on that Intreno, but it's been a nice run. So for so so. So thank you for that. So itsounds like you've got just a really...

...strong background in all thingscommercialization, especially around med device. So I'm really excited tokind of dig into some of your experience today. So so, as you thinkabout this commercialization process, what from your perspective is like thenumber one, the most important strategy for success? So when you think about what it takesto to do great in this marketplace, there's three characteristcs. You haveto really have it. It's dry, grit and belief, and when I talk about thesethings to people, it's really key that these are your in a character, racicsTad. Nobody can really train you on you're, born with tes a when I talkabout drive its you get out of bed in the morning and are you inspired to getup and go to work and be excited about what you're doing? If you have thatdrive every day where you can't fall asleep or you just, you can't wait toget Tho sleep you can get to tomorrow. That's a real key thing to have right,and then you got to have this grip where, let's just face it, things arenot getting any easier in the medical device roll for anybody to havesuccessan it's getting harder hospitals once you can solve fat, vast, less WEPaccess, and now that things have happened with covid nineteen, they wantfewer people to interact with anyone in the hospital. You have to have thatgrip to be there and with vendor consolidation. There's a lot of largecompnies out there who have good relationships, a good market position.You have to fight them. It takes a lot of grit to do that. But then, on top ofit is once you have access you can get in the funt of people. You have todemonstrate that beliefing, what you're doing what you're promoting is reallysomething that's going to make a difference in either that surgeon thatpatient for that hospital outcome and that belief comes from within, and ifyou have that people will feel that energy from you and they will just wantto listen to you and want to try what...

...you have and those are the things thatreally you have to start with that foundation. In order to be successful, you know it's so true I mean those.Those three traits are, I think, fundamentalno matter what you're tryingto commercialize, O or sell. I mean really, ultimately, no matter whatyou're trying to do in your career, but even more so in health care, that itrequires this sense of resilience that we might not have to have in otherindustries. If you plan to survive yeah, it's so true, and it's even harder whenyou're younger in your career and you're, trying to get acclimated withthis right, because things are starting off a lot harder.Now, where there's people who are more veteran in these roles, where they havethe established relationships, they have the contacts they understand whatit takes to work in these environment. So it's a lot easier for them tonavigate the change where someone's bran new they're, starting with areally really large disadvantage compared tosome of their appears. That have been doing this for quite some time, so yeahLif, it goes intit yeah starting off in the covid world, is a whole different,dynamic, adifferent environment. So let's just talk about Covid for aminute you know, so. Obviously I would imagine that things have it goneexactly like planned when you guys first launched on two twousdanineteen,two thousand thnt, two thousand and twenty one has been a bit differentthan anyone could have possibly predicted, and so how has that affected?Or has it affected your your commercialization and and youkN W your launch and roll out? So when you look at it, everything was normal.During that time, in two thousand and nineteen, you had your ffence if you'rewilling to run you're running the game playing you're exxecuting on it, thingsare going great, Hey, Gan, to Tak off two thousand and twenty and everyone'scharged up because the prior year list at a successful launch and you've got.Everyone is just full of energy and theres. All this wind pushing youforward right, you git these great...

...talins and then January February, gratand then march hits and all of a sudden things come to a grinding hole, an veryabrutly and everyone's initially taking in that shock of okay. Let's see,rejist takes us, R's Gonto be two weeks slowdown. Things aren't going to happen,then of course, naturally lik it's extended and then the first time Ithink in history. Probably ever you saw something that was never going to beoccurring, which was hospitals were now limiting surgical procedures. I thinkanybody who's been in the business long enough always said medical device andphormasceuticals will be session Prov, but we never thought we'd Hevete talkabout them being pandemic. Proof right right, right, fro mindset so now,you're sitting there wondering okay, we have surgeons who are rotating shifts,they're at home, theyr, limiting numbers of surgical procedureshappening because they want to make sure hat. There's not too many bedsbeing taken away from the potential need for IC US needed right now the orsare becoming makeshift. I see it. Everything is happening, real timechanges were being engomented in place daily, and now everything is just all bets are off.All triends are out thei way, Os O. Not you really can't. You can't look backat prior history to figure out how this is going to play out right, Oras, we'veseen from them to now. You learn a lot more about this virus. How how itmutates, how t his infected, how it can be prevented, how it can be treated sothings start to change, but one thing that was really interesting that welearned during this was the definition of an elective procedure really changedright prior to you. Think, okay, elective might be total kneereplacement or I'm going to get this Herny a fixed or I'm going to have someplastic surgery, the rerminor things, but then elective became something thatwasn't life threatening. So in other words right. If you need surgery butthey're not going to tormanate, if they...

...don't get the surgery soon. So let'sdelay an less po wortize who needs to come in. So you have to think about howthat changed. The whole world which we give we could spend hours talking aboutriht yeah w from our perspective commercially and talking to a lot ofother CEOS who are in similarly situated businesses like ours. Weprobably lost sommer between sixty eight months of business right, theworst hot it was in April may started to rebound a little bit. Jun Got BetterJuly, had gone well and then August September through the rest of the year.The trajectory just went straight up, and then you had this second wave. Yes,a picked off January and February with a slowdown, but the slowdown was moregeographic. We saw certain pockets of the country slow down and then all of asudden, now speaking for US and other folks marches just taken offtremendously, so a to feel really good about where things are going and asrestriction start to ease more people become vaccinated. I think we're in amuch better place to manage through this process than we were, but duringthat time we had to start thinking about okay. What can we do differentlyyeah and make sure were maintaining some relevant, so what we did duringthat time was we really focused a lot internally on developing our people,working on some different skill, ses that they could use some touch andtraining on. I think anytime, you're in a startup environment, you are justhitting the accelerator and your goal is to go out there and touch as manycustomers as possible and get the word out about what you're trying toaccomplish. Sometimes, you don't get to professionally develop er people, andyou don't get to do as much of developing your key opinion. Leadersamd other customer targets right, so we spent time investing a lot of zoomvideos. Several a day internally and then what else we were doing wasoffering educational platforms. So we did over thirty educational platformswhere we could speak to different types of healthcare providers about ourproduct, tea mistakes, complications of...

...bleeding and we had a great audiencebecause, as I was alluding to earlier, people were around, they were notworking, the same shifts and level of hours that they normally would on adato day basis. So we had a great audience and we were able to engage alot of people. So when things started to open up, it really benefited US- andwe hit this like a spring board and really started to achieve a lot of ourgoals. Much fast, and I thought anybody had anticipators to do so. So let meask you how how is this you know? Did you already have thoseestablished relationships? Because when I hear you describe this strategytactic of educating, you know kind of in the meat in the interm and stillbeing able to deliver value and build that report. BUILL Trust, if you're a startup company, you mightnot always have those connections to be able to get in front of those people.So so did you guys already have that in place or was there something elsecreatively that you were doing to actually even be able to invite them?So you think about how you structure these organizations. I think a lot ofventure capital, private equity start up CEOS and operations, folks theyalways wrestle with how to structure your organization right. So it's a verysimilar exercise and discussion that happend and always borrooms across theglobe. So what do you do? Do you hire very experienced people and go verydirect yea byour experience, commercializationleaders and go this independent route and try to get really good tenaltynines to help you promote your products, or do you balance at Ha Hybrid? Whatwe've done here? Wis We put a hybric together. So there's other people likemyself, who have been some industry veterans and have experience in thisspace and he understand his products. These technologies unterstand how tonavigate hospitals, the understand what the buying decision process is like andwe have a balance with different ten ninty, nine that are our independentdistribuors and we've also been...

...fortunte enough to as well to have aretired cardiac surgeon on our team. His name is eftor bill spotis. He isarguably the most published author on Hemis TAT sealance and it hesays he hasover ninety publishe paper. So there are a tremendous amount of cardiacsurgeons who know him well and know his work, but even with that said, younever know all of the potential surgeons and contacts Yore trying toreach. But you have that foundation. I think that foundation helps you puttogether an offense that you can try to work with similar specialty. So did weknow everyone that we constantly stayed in touch with now, but what we did waswe used our network. We used the skills from things that we've done in the pastand try to help us stay top of mind to all of these other people. We wanted tointeract with and that's helped us because there were a lot of people thatwe were meeting for the first time on meetings. I remember doing a lot ofzoom videos introducing myself to a lot of surgeons and I wam just happy tolisten to them, speak and hear their perspectives and gain their insightwhen so, there's always sometimes you can go to the folks that you've knownfor a long time and you can have really good conversations. So it's just it'sstriking that balance and it's not easy, but I think you have to really rely onyour network going into this. But if you're in a group where you don't havethat strong network, you need to have some type of benefit for them. Wanting to spend timewith you right, because I ca me thirty minutes to an hour of their time right,that's Takin, away from family patient, you name it somehat! Something else isgoing to have to give for that. So there needs to be some type of a value,addto them right. What is the hot button that a they're thinking about?What is the issue? You can help solve for them, yeah think once you've onceyou understand that now you can really start to get some traction with people, so so George, I want to ask you, Whan,O tin, to switch gears to get a bit, so you- and I were talking earlier- wewere talking about positioning and how...

...we positiond the innovation being sucha critical step to that commercialization process. Talk alittle bit about that. What how do you define positioning and how is thatimpacted your strategy going forward? So you have to think about this fromdifferent angles and I think any time you're coming out of the new clod orsomething I's going to be what a hospital would look like as addingcouse or adding another Sku to the inventory. What are you trying toaccomplish? Are you in a commodity line where you going to bring a qualityproduct at a much lower price point to create value? Are you at a unique nicheproduct? That's going to solve some type of unmet need or you can demand apremium or are you going to have a vergy good product that can solve needsand it can be compatitively priced so that you're not adding to thehealthcare system? Caust your finding ways to reduce o. You can createefficiencies. You can do different things, so every company has to wrestle with thatwhen they're going through this because just getting an FDA approval, dependingon whether you're going through a fivetk process wel we had to go throughthe PMA, those take significant time in investment and you're working with FDA.So sometimes your investors don't have the appetite to give you anything elsemore than the approval, ofo're gonna findnow. You need to go out there andCommercializ is and anything else you want. Imagine. So it's challenging N, it's the pathwaywhere, for us in particular, we wanted to launch with very good clinical dataand have a good story to tell because a lot of times you don't get that so weactually have seven published papers in reputable surgery, journals that helpus to promote outcomes for our product. But even if we didn't have those juston our characteristics alone, the PRICIS, unique and Otfright there's nomixing, no thaling or refrigeration is...

...simple to use, it sticks to tissue andit works, and it works really well and the FDA indication that the team wasable to get is one that no one else has in theire labeling. So that alone wasreally key in Ta Strategy, and I think you have to start putting these thingsin mind when you're going through your product developments Ta Age, with yourteams of what do you want to be able to say when the profess approve? So if youdon't have a single, published clinical study when it's launched, what are theclaims you want to be able to make and you have to incorporate those into theRMD pathway? And if you can have that foresight early enough from the process,then you can get the ground running. Otherwise, you don't want to be in aspot where you're you're begging people to try this out and see if it works.Well, right, you want to have a a way you can go to people with confidenceand going back to a point. You said earlier of Hey: what do you do whenyou've got the established network? Are you tapping into it that helps you getan entryway into showing someone new technology yea, but there is a singlesurgeon on the planet that I know will use a product that is not adequate orinferior. If they've got a relationship with you right, they're not just goingto use something because ofthink what it will do, is it Woll lot of youopper?I like you, but not that much, I'm not putting any patient at risk for myoutcoman right, Asle, there's no way tyey're going to do that, but we'llgive the opportunity speak to them at least have a good dialonge. So I th, I think, tha the you know,spending just a little bit more tie even on the position is so importantand I hope that our viewers and and listeners you know kind of glean on tothis. I talk a lot about when I'm working with clients. This nonhealthcare example of something I think most people can relate to of just thedifference between positioning of like Taco, Bell and Chapotley. You know whenyou've got two companies that are going to play in the same space, but theyreally don't play in the same space...

...right. The buyer for Taco Bell is verydifferent than the buyer for Capotley and and they fought really long andhard and strategically about how they position those to when, in some waysyou might seen similar products for other people, it's like well, no, no,those are not even close to being similar products, and I I mean- and Ithink that same approach is just as critical in health care when we'retalking about this commercialization process, especially for someone likeyourself when you're saying that you're going up against the market of tworeally strong incumbents and and if you don't have clarity on the space thatyou're going to own and be able to communicate that clearly to your targetaudience. Well, it makes it so much more difficult to actually be able tosteal market share from them. Its becomes incredibly challengingbecause, again, you hit it right on the head right. Are you somebody who wantsto have a race, the bottom and just sell the lowest cost pod an move, alout of volume eah were: Do you want to have something that is reputabledependable, that you're going to pay an okay price for, but you're comfortablewith it, because you know you're going to get what you pay for, and that holdstrue a lot in this industry and when you talk about sometimes salesfolks, they think Automaticaly, a smissomeone from purchasing ask andwhat price it is. They get very nervous and they almost don't want to even saywhat they're the price of their true product cost, because they theirautomoutaly going to assume that the persons Gan tell him so expensive. Youhave to do better, which is that right there, everyone's always Trina for abetter price, but it doesn't mean your price is high and I think sometimes a lot of industry folks will get caughtup in the fact that if they have a pot thats, let's say three or four hundredollars they might perceive. As being expensive, but they don't realize, theperson who they're talking to at this moment is signing pos and purchaseorders for products that are five tenfifteen twenty hundred three hundredthousanddollar at a time, but they do a...

...great job of making. You think that youare ruining the entire budget of the OVERASO. You just have to know whatyou're going into and have confidence in which you're promoting, but it alsomatters to is who's helping advocate with you. So if it's just you, as theindustry person advocating you've, got a weaker situation to be into you needto have that. clanation really talk about the benefits of this andChampionis for you to the process. Otherwise, then, no one's going tobelieve your story, no matter what you tell thim, because if there isn't asurgeon champion back in you in this industry, you're really out of luck.Unless you've got something, that's commoditized that you can come in thereand createive value or there's some significant change to the process inwhatever Ou're going to be working in the operating room, whatever it may be,tit's going to create a major efficiency and it's changeable andrecognizable right, gossl O- and it's not a knock on the hospital system.They just don't do a good job on measuring the intangible savings thatlead to things right like if you say hey, this prodect is going to reduceyour your rate of infection, but we don't know what raght that's going todecrease it by, but doing this O nherently reduce that it's a hardcelless. You have the tangible study right and who's investing in that veryonpwloar doing that. So you have to go through this whole algorithm andprocess of doing things, but it can be done so so two other angles that I wantto kind of explore with this. Is You know so in health care? We're usuallytalking about multiple stakeholders that are involved in the buying process,and so what are you encountering? And maybe how are you overcoming this? Whenyou know you've got a hospital system that may be writing the check and thenyou've got a surgeon. That's actually e the user right of the tool and beingable to make sure that that you're, getting by in from all ofthe state holders, not just one, because if the surgent says yes, theywant to use it. Can they? And so how is all that working and then,once you get the sale, you know what...

...are? What are your experiences whenyou're trying to actually get adoption? For you know? Sometimes we assume that,just because a product is better that it's just going to be so obvious thatnow it's available they're just going to start using it, and one of thethings that I see with some clients is that you know we close the deal butnobody's actually adopting the solution because they're, you know kind of stilltied to their old habits and old practices, ore old tools that they'vebeen using. So I know I threw a lot atof you kind of two levels. Well, you've gottwo really interesting Chanees to have the second scenar wis. The one that weaspire to get to for US personally is an organization because Aciv once wehave things improve, then it's a lot easier for us to fynd people who willwant to use thesh price. But when you talk about what's going on that, it'slike you bring up a lot of different instances that happen. So you can patexamples. I won't mention names O systems, but you'll have this large,IDN or large. Purchasing enity and they'll have several members that areunderneath it and you'll always have these local hospitals or the oneofhospitaliside the system, that's Wone, to bucket and buy something off of thecontract because they do believe it's better for their patients. They do haveha surgin champion Ho wanted and you can navigate that through. Then youhave the other systems that say look. We only have one vendor in thiscategory N we're not going to degae can't even know if you might havesomething in our compliance. It says you only have to purchase ninetypercent of a goog room for a card off or something unique or whatever it maybe. So you have to understand how to navigate through that process, and you have to keep knocking on differentdoors in order to find out who's willing to fight hard enough for you tohave this in, in other words, is, have you done a good enough of a job reallyfinding the right champion, because I think a lot of times it happens tocommercial people is that they get fixator on a one individual, becausethey have a title and they think they...

...need to get to that person and theirlookwarm on whether they want to really fight this bottl go to a committeemeeting it's going to cancel thit the reschedule they've missd time in theirday to keep going and going through that process. It is exhausting, andit's intentionally done by the systems to see how bad at is want to push for aprobem and they O ta. You know this pretty well, so they knowthat if, if they push back on you hard enough, you're, eventually going togive up and forget about this new product, because you really didn't needit that badly. So you have to do work and find out who is rilling to fightthat battle, and you have to point blank. Ask them look. This is what'sgoing to happen. I know you're awore. This are you willing to do this,because, if you're not we're just not going to have success here in thishealth system, some of is going to come down to, they can do their job, but nowit's going to come back to you to the negotiating table and how creative areyou willing to get or you're going to stay very rigid into okay? Everyhospital gets this price. They can't get this deal unless they do xy ANZ,and you have to also be willing to be flexible in how you structure a deal,because every customer purchases differently every system operates in adifferent way. You can have some he large GPOS after, like health trust,for example. I do a great job of driving compliance of their contractidvendors. You can find members in that system who will get the best thing theycan for their patients. They wo will do that and then, over time, you'll buildup enough demand where you're going to make enough noise at they want to talkto you about a national agreement, yeah and you're fighting for those things,but you really have to make sure that you're finding the right people to work withyou in his process, because it's not just you asking someone to try theproduct right, but those days have dissipated tremendously, where thesurgen would ask for it: the either chargners or Perryap Cornair or thesupply chain personis order it the next day. Those days almost don't existanywhere anymore and we have to be...

...really diligent on how we're doingthings and what we're asking for that and then once you get it in, that's I think more than on you as acommercial, individual. Okay. Now, how are you engaging the potential users?Can you get into the hospital and have a reason to be in the operating roomyears ago? You would spend time in the operating room. You'd have a chance tolook at the surgical board. You would know who was operating when you runinto them and you get a chance to connect and that's being morerestrictive, now, especially thing with covid and having access. So what elseare you doing? Do you have a chance to invest in any live laps where they cando demonstrations? Cadavers, Orr you doing any programs that are of interestfor them right, there's different ways for you engage your customers and havean opportunity com invited into their rooms and be there. But it's a loteasier to ask somebody to pull the prod and try on their next case tomorrow.Then it is to ask them. Would you mind champion, is through the vio analysiscommittee process for six months, they're going to say you lot. WOR, yes,is to trying it tomorrow when you've already done a leg work in there. So Ithink, if anyone's confuling about not being able to drive adoption, that'sthe best problem, you could have you're like that's a win in my book. Oh my goodness! So so what else do youknow kind of thinking about our audience? There's definitely going tobe some otherchief commercial officers for MED device companies, but you knowthey'll be chief innovation officers at hospital systems as well as just otherinnovators that a in the trenches, what advice do you have for them goingfrom concept to commercialization, so involve a lot of different stak overso as you're developing your products and you thinking about your strategybring in people from all different walks. Don't just only limit it tosurgeons, who are innovators and and users bring in people who work insupply, Ching people who are in contracting people who are there in theoperating rooms, different charge,...

...nurses, different text, everyone,anybody who's going to be you hate to overuse the word stay colder, butanyone who's going to have a in in this product in this process get theirfeedback on how to do it, because the things you want to think about whenyou're in these stages and look some chief commercial officer, some folkswho are in these companies they're coming into the company to help themgrow their business everything's already been done, so they can't goback and reline, but if you have those chances to do that, you want to thinkabout it. Okay, what are we going to price this at well?Make sure you've done your homework ehough to come in and price it right,because you don't always get a second chance that comes to the negotiatingtable. So if you make somebody upset with you on your pricing they're notgoing to welcome you back Af, you said: Hey we're! KNOCT going off two thousand,an thirty forty, fifty percent now they're going to say well, where wereyou the first time when I was interested right, you've got a Lok thatright don't come to your circulating nurses or your surgical tech or yourassistance and say: okay, we can try to make this more efficient for you, butcan you at least try to muscle through it now for us and they're going to say?Well? Why din't you ask US ahead of time, as you were developing it. Didyou not talk to you, a single person who works in the Operatig Room Right,vto, other raps, who either are in that segment or theyre adjacent to its? Theycan tell you look. This is how this works. This is what we do. These arethe challenges we face understand that right, but then sometimes you're in asituation where you're right into a company and everything's already been built for you.So now you have to go out and figure out how to do your job and that's whatyou need to get really tight and you have to set right expectations, wofhpeople and say: Okay, look! This is the satement. We think we can capture. Weunderstand, you'r telling us the market opportunity here is worth a hundredmillion dollars if we had all the market share but realistically of thespecialties we're going to play in with what we have Toa or more conoffor. TOUMAG be five million for ten million right. That's if we maximun that right.So you want to make sure you're setting the ID expectations, because I think...

...many people get enamored with going inand take big company experience and bring it to a startup and they're goingto work that offense and it's going to work. It's not always effective becauseyou know when you come in these pot startups, you don't have that samelevel of resources. You don't have any massiveteen right. You are the teamright and wheever Elseis with you everyone's taking on every role, and Ithink you have to make sure that you understand what you're signing up forbut again it's drive, Britin belief. If you have those characterristics, itwill propel you through this because you'll find a different pieces ofinformation. You Don' CNDERUNCOVER yeah. I was working with a cliet not too long ago, who came fromPhillips and then decided to go out and start a startup company innovating,something you know some kind of med device on their own and wow you. Youknow just as we workd through that whole commercialization process. It waslike wow. This is so different. I'm used to having a team to go out and doall this stuff for me, like. I know, high level how to do it,but I'm not the one. That's been usually executing that, and now I'm ateam of five, and so I'm having to do all of these things that I roll up mysleeve and do all these things that I never had to do before, because I don'thave the personeliy to rely on because we just don't have the resources forthat. A IT'S GREAT! You have this idea and they said: Okay well, go ahead,AUTE ROK! You want you to execute this and get it done and you're going to saywhat wo I need people and you now don always have that and I think same timeto, but I also think too, the post are making a hiring for those roles. Theyhave to do their homework and make sure they're hiring people who have thatability to have a long runway and have those capabilities to do those thingsbut you're so spot on with that Yeah Yep. Well, thank you! So much for your timetoday it's been a great conversation, very invaluable insights to ouraudience. How can folks get a hold of you if anyone wants to follow up withyou after the episode? So even want you...

...connect with me, you can reach me on mylenting page: It's not privites an you're able to access Beeun and I'msure they can connect with you and if thou want to get in comepack with me,then well work. Something else in that scamp Plin. Okay, sounds great. Thankyou so much for joining me today, George Okay, you have a great rest ofthe Dayn great weekend. Thank you so much for listening. I knowyou're busy working to bring your life changing innovation to market, and Ivalue your time and attention to get the latest episodes on your mobiledevice automatically subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast AP, likeApple Podcast, sotify and stitcher. Thank you for listening, and Iappreciate everyone who shared the show with friends and colleagues, see you onthe next episode of Health, innovator.

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Episodes (103)